Test For Diabetes Joplin MO

By Karin Evans Ten months ago, I wound up in an emergency room when my body began to melt into sugar. I know that sounds melodramatic, but that's what happened. For at least a year I'd been feeling pretty tired, but I kept chalking it up to my late-in-life role as the mother of two young daughters, plus hormonal changes, too many deadlines, and too little sleep. Besides, I was doing a lot of thi...

David Ellis Dugger, MD
(417) 627-8370
2817 Mc Clelland Blvd Ste 50
Joplin, MO
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Vanderbilt Univ Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37232
Graduation Year: 1976
Hospital
Hospital: Freeman Hosp -West, Joplin, Mo; St Johns Reg Medctr, Joplin, Mo
Group Practice: Mercy Health Ctr

Data Provided by:
Suzanne Michelle Breckenridge, MD
(314) 362-4453
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: UT Houston: MD: 2001
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided by:
Ralph Oiknine
(314) 469-6224
222 S Woods Mill Rd
Chesterfield, MO
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Data Provided by:
Garry Stuart Tobin, MD
(314) 362-4417
9448 Bonhomme Woods Dr
Olivette, MO
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Dr.Robert Saltman
(314) 878-6008
969 N Mason Rd # 145
Saint Louis, MO
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1980
Speciality
Endocrinologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.5, out of 5 based on 7, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Susana D'Amico, MD
(417) 627-8700
3126 S Jackson Ave Ste 200
Joplin, MO
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Central De Venezuela, Esc De Med "luis Razetti", Caracas
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Rachel Lynn Fishman-Oiknine
(314) 469-6224
222 S Woods Mill Rd
Chesterfield, MO
Specialty
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Data Provided by:
Veronica McGregor, MD
(314) 434-8850
1227 Fern Ridge Pkwy
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Nac De San Agustin, Prog Acad De Med, Arequipa, Peru
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Lamice Riad El Kholy, MD
1 Barnes Jewish Hospital Plz
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Ain Shams Univ, Fac Of Med, Abbasia, Cairo, Egypt (330-04 Pr 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
Kelly Seiler, MD
(816) 234-1660
2401 Gillham Rd
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of South Fl Coll Of Med, Tampa Fl 33612
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

What You Don't Know About Diabetes...

Provided by: 

By Karin Evans

Ten months ago, I wound up in an emergency room when my body began to melt into sugar. I know that sounds melodramatic, but that’s what happened.

For at least a year I’d been feeling pretty tired, but I kept chalking it up to my late-in-life role as the mother of two young daughters, plus hormonal changes, too many deadlines, and too little sleep. Besides, I was doing a lot of things to take care of myself: eating healthfully, running every day, practicing yoga when I could. But overall, my energy was droopy and getting worse.

I went for a checkup. The doctor did the standard tests, asked the standard questions. “Getting enough sleep?” “As much as I can,” I answered with a shrug. I had other, minor, complaints—blurry vision, numb fingers, a pain in the ball of one foot—and was sent to the appropriate specialists. I was given reassurances, eyedrops, a wrist brace. And so I went home, vowing to pop a few more vitamins, have a massage, get to bed earlier.

Then I started feeling fluish. I figured it was just the generic winter cold or flu, but it hung on for two weeks, then three. A month later I could hardly get out of bed. I began to crave liquids, my feet flopped when I walked, and my mind began to work strangely. My eyes became so blurry that I couldn’t read my computer screen or watch the nightly news. When I stepped on the scale, I found I had lost five pounds, even though I had stopped exercising by this point. The next week I lost five more.

“I think I’m dying,” I said casually to my husband. The colors of the room seemed brighter and my head was filled with German and Mandarin, languages I had studied but didn’t normally speak. “This can’t go on,” he said, so the next day I dragged myself to a new physician.

The doctor listened and sent for the nurse, who pricked my finger and tested my blood. The doctor looked at the results and whistled softly. “You have diabetes,” he said. Then he sent me to the emergency room.

I lay in the ER with an insulin drip in my arm while they did a bunch of tests. Then they told me I had something called diabetic ketoacidosis, which is basically a way station on the road to a diabetic coma. In this state, blood sugar levels are sky high. My reading was 675. Yours, if you are reading this, don’t have diabetes, and have not just consumed a huge banana split, is probably around 80 or 110 max.

The young nurse who took care of me kept shaking her head. “When they said we had a case of ketoacidosis, I kept looking around the ER for someone really overweight and in bad shape. I couldn’t believe it was you.”

“Me either,” I said weakly. It’s not that I thought diabetes was a rare illness. I’d read the statistics. In this country, an estimated one out of three people born in the year 2000 will develop the disease. And I’d heard enough about the complications that can ensue—blindness, heart attack, amputation, and kidney failure—to know that diabetes is a very scary disease.

What I didn’t...

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