Brewer’s Yeast Tablets Lisle IL

This page provides useful content and local businesses that give access to Urologists in Lisle, IL. You will find helpful, informative articles about Urologists, including "Good News for Men (and Dogs)", "Should men be screened for Prostate Cancer?". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Lisle, IL that will answer all of your questions about Urologists.

Geoffery Engel, MD
(847) 593-0404
800 Biesterfield Rd
Elk Grove Village, IL
Business
Northwest Suburban Urology Associates SC
Specialties
Urology

Data Provided by:
Bejan J Fakouri
(630) 369-1572
1259 Rickert Dr
Naperville, IL
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Paul Bayard Lyon, MD
(630) 369-1572
1259 Rickert Dr Ste 200
Naperville, IL
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: Hinsdale Hosp, Hinsdale, Il
Group Practice: Dupage Urology Associates Ltd

Data Provided by:
William Edward Kolbusz
(630) 964-3839
1034 Warren Ave
Downers Grove, IL
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Phuong Nguyen Huynh, MD
(630) 960-1498
3825 Highland Ave Ste 207
Downers Grove, IL
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Rush Med Coll Of Rush Univ, Chicago Il 60612
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided by:
Guillermo P Gonzales Jr, MD
(773) 645-0795
4326 Hatch Ln
Lisle, IL
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Santo Tomas, Fac Of Med And Surg, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
Robert Marion Pasciak, MD
(630) 369-1572
1259 Rickert Dr Ste 200
Naperville, IL
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Languages
Polish
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Advocate Good Samaritan Hosp, Downers Grove, Il; Edward Hosp, Naperville, Il
Group Practice: Dupage Urology Associates Ltd

Data Provided by:
Robert M Pasciak
(630) 369-1572
1259 Rickert Dr
Naperville, IL
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Paul Joseph West, MD
(630) 960-1498
3825 Highland Ave Ste 207
Downers Grove, IL
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch, Chicago Il 60611
Graduation Year: 1968
Hospital
Hospital: Advocate Good Samaritan Hosp, Downers Grove, Il; Hinsdale Hosp, Hinsdale, Il
Group Practice: West Suburban Urology

Data Provided by:
Nader Sadoughi, MD
(708) 852-9220
3825 Highland Ave
Downers Grove, IL
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Shiraz Univ Of Med Sci, Shiraz, Iran
Graduation Year: 1961

Data Provided by:
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Good News for Men (and Dogs)

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By Susan Edmiston

Men, take note: The evidence for an easy, inexpensive way to prevent your number-one malignancy—prostate cancer—has reached critical mass. Prostate cancer strikes nearly 200,000 men each year and kills more than 30,000, and it can devastate a man’s sex life. But you may be able to avoid that fate by taking a simple daily supplement of the mineral selenium.

In fact, the evidence for selenium has swelled into a tide even the FDA couldn’t ignore. Last February the agency, notoriously reluctant to give any supplement its imprimatur, allowed health claims to be made for selenium, stating that the mineral may reduce the risk of certain cancers. Although it permitted only a qualified claim—research has yet to determine exact dosages and other factors that may affect the supplement’s effectiveness—the agency’s action put selenium on the map as one of the most powerful weapons in our anti-cancer arsenal.

Research first linked higher levels of selenium to reduced cancer risk in the 1960s. But the results of a ten-year study, published in 1996, thrust the mineral into the spotlight. The late Larry Clark, then associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Arizona Cancer Center, had done a series of studies linking skin cancer to low selenium levels and decided to put his theory to the ultimate test: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. For an average of four and a half years, 1,312 volunteers took either brewer’s yeast tablets containing 200 micrograms of selenium or placebos.

Clark was surprised to find that the selenium had no effect on the skin cancers he was studying. But, as another selenium expert put it, “Then serendipity stepped in.” Poring over his data, Clark noticed that the three leading cancers in men—lung, prostate, and colon—were significantly lower in the people taking selenium. He redesigned the study to collect more complete information and ultimately found a moderate decrease in cancer overall, but a whopping 63 percent lower risk of prostate cancer among the selenium-takers. (The study found no decrease in cancers for women, but since it focuses primarily on men—as does most subsequent selenium research—the jury’s still out on whether women can benefit from supplements, too.)

Other researchers rushed to follow Clark’s trail. In 1987, at Harvard, 33,737 male health professionals were asked to send in their toenail clippings, a measure of long-term selenium intake. Four years later, when the researchers matched the men to their clippings, they found that the rate of prostate cancer had decreased by one-half to two-thirds in those with the highest selenium levels.

But perhaps the most exciting evidence of selenium’s powers comes from a bunch of elderly beagles. As a comparative oncologist (an expert in cancers affecting both humans and animals), David Waters, of Purdue University, knew that beagles also tend to develop prostate cancer with age, and that selenium had been shown to lower the risk...

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...

Should men be screened for Prostate Cancer?

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If you are a man over 50, you have probably been encouraged to undergo regular screening for prostate cancer. This involves a doctor examining your prostate (the digital rectal exam, or DRE) and a blood test (the prostate-specific antigen, or PSA). The theory is that testing can catch cancer early and thus save lives.But is this true? Are we certain that screening healthy men for prostate cancer saves lives? The simple answer is no.Whether you decide to have a prostate test is a decision only you can make after you’ve discussed the pros and cons with your doctor. Prostate cancer is a killer, and some doctors believe that screening is an effective early-warning measure. Unfortunately, doctors don’t always inform patients about the risks involved.In fact, if you study the research available on prostate cancer screening, you’re likely to conclude that screening does more harm than good. And there is no reliable evidence that it decreases deaths from prostate cancer. This is why there is no national screening program for prostate cancer in Canada, Australia, the U.K. and many European countries. We aren’t alone in questioning the value of screening. There are at least 23 organizations of experts around the world that do not recommend screening healthy men for prostate cancer. This includes the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, arguably the most scholarly body of screening experts in the country. For a screening test to be justified, it must meet three major criteria: The test must be accurate; it must not lead to any dangerous or harmful outcomes; and doctors must agree that there is a clear and proven treatment that can change the outcome of the disease.The screening test for prostate cancer fails on all three counts.First, the DRE and PSA tests are inaccurate. With DRE, you may as well flip a coin—that would work as reliably as a doctor’s finger. A finger can only reach the back and sides of the prostate, so there is a 50% chance it will miss any cancer. And DRE misses cancers at their earliest stages, when the chances are greatest that they can be cured. With PSA, there is a high rate of false positives. You can get a false positive if you have infection, inflammation or noncancerous enlargement of your prostate. PSA tests also produce a high rate of false negatives.Second, the tests can have many damaging outcomes with permanent, life-altering effects. For a start, if your PSA is positive, you’ll likely have a biopsy. The procedure causes pain, bleeding from your rectum and bleeding into your urine and semen; it can also cause infection. Many men find that their sex lives are impaired while waiting for, or after receiving, a biopsy.But there’s an outcome that is far worse. Prostate cancer is common—and in most cases harmless. The danger of screening is that many men will be diagnosed with, and subsequently treated for, a “disease” that isn’t hurting them. There are millions of men in the U.S. with cancer cells in their prostates. The cancer ...

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...