Asthma Specialists Willmar MN

Scenarios like this are typical of the hold asthma exerted on my life for many years. Episodes came and went, with spasms gripping my bronchial tubes, inflammation swelling the mucous membranes, and phlegm choking the breath out of me.

Linda Leah Hedemark, MD
(612) 348-3031
525 Portland Ave
Minneapolis, MN
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
William M Brutinel
(507) 284-2511
200 1st St Sw
Rochester, MN
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

Data Provided by:
Mitchell G Kaye
(612) 863-9062
920 E 28th St
Minneapolis, MN
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

Data Provided by:
Peter C Gay
(507) 284-2511
200 1st St Sw
Rochester, MN
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

Data Provided by:
Melissa Buffington King, MD
(612) 624-0999
420 Delaware St SE
Minneapolis, MN
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Krista Kay Graven, MD
(608) 263-3036
4151 Kindred Way
Lake Elmo, MN
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Michele Marie Le Claire, MD
Minneapolis, MN
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Joseph John Martinelli, MD
920 E 1st St Ste 201
Duluth, MN
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St George'S Univ, Sch Of Med, St George'S, Grenada
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Dr.Timothy Aksamit
(507) 284-2511
200 First St SW
Rochester, MN
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 1985
Speciality
Pulmonologist
General Information
Hospital: St Marys Hospital Of Rochester, Rochester, Mn
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Norman Yunis
(763) 520-2940
3366 Oakdale Ave N
Robbinsdale, MN
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

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Unwinding from Asthma

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By Swaha Devi

Like clockwork, a 2 a.m. asthma attack shut down my airways and jolted me out of sleep. The sweet relief of breath was at arm’s length, in the emergency inhaler on my night table. One quick spray and within seconds I felt my bronchial tubes begin to relax, allowing precious air to enter.

The next development was all too predictable. The drug made my heart race, and I couldn’t fall back asleep until just moments before the alarm clock rang, ending my brief respite.

Scenarios like this are typical of the hold asthma exerted on my life for many years. Episodes came and went, with spasms gripping my bronchial tubes, inflammation swelling the mucous membranes, and phlegm choking the breath out of me.

The attacks were at their worst when I lived in Florida, where the intense humidity caused mildew to flourish, aggravating my condition. I often felt like I was trying to breathe under water. Nor did my job as a tech writer in an old airplane hangar—full of mold, chemical fumes, and cigarette smoke—help matters. I can’t count the times when it seemed impossible to think clearly enough to get through the day. I tried allergy shots, but hated having to poke myself with a needle, so I quit the job instead. When a doctor told me my only option was to take medicine for the rest of my life, I finally found the courage to say enough.

My first order of business was to stop an attack without using inhalers. I accomplished this within weeks through a variety of methods, including taking first hot, then cold showers to relax the spasms, and hovering over steam infused with eucalyptus oil for long periods. But I was still living from one attack to the next. I needed to get to the root of the problem.

Once I began digging, clues turned up everywhere (even in King Tut’s tomb, where the anti-inflammatory herb licorice, now known as a decongestant, was unearthed alongside other treasures). Ultimately, though, putting the disease behind me required tending to much more than my closed airways. Top of the list? Stress.

Once I started paying attention, I realized almost anything—a cold, deadline pressures, bad news, or bad weather—could start me wheezing. Emotional stress of any kind was a particularly powerful trigger.

Elson Haas, a physician and director of the Preventive Medicine Center of Marin in San Rafael, California, isn’t surprised. Stress kicks off physiological responses that lead directly to breathing troubles, he says. What’s the first thing people do when they’re nervous? Take shorter breaths, of course. Plus, the body releases certain hormones when we’re under stress (particularly adrenaline and cortisol) that open up the airways—but once the stress goes away and these hormones subside, the bronchial tubes can tighten up again.

Clearly, I needed to coax my body into staying calm. (Stop and smell the roses? I was allergic to them!)

You’d think my living situation would have been a help. I was part of a yoga community at the time...

Author: Swaha Devi

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