Sciatica Treatment Oak Creek WI

If your leg cramps and you feel pain, burning, tingling, or discomfort that runs from your lower back down the back of either leg, a disk low in your spine may be pressing on the nerve that runs through that area. Called sciatica, this condition can last for weeks, although most people eventually recover with rest. The ancient technique of reflexology offers an easy, effective method to loosen sciatica’s grip and speed your recovery.

Dr.Alvin Wells
(414) 768-0940
200 E Ryan Rd # 101
Oak Creek, WI
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M
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Rheumatologist
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Accepting New Patients: Yes
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3.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Mark A Schrager, MD
(414) 961-4009
5900 S Lake Dr
Cudahy, WI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
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Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1970

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Allan L Goldman
(414) 672-8550
2901 W Kk River Pkwy
Milwaukee, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Roxabella D Torres, MD
(414) 328-8747
2424 S 90th St Ste 302
West Allis, WI
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Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
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Female
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Medical School: Univ Of Pr Sch Of Med, San Juan Pr 00936
Graduation Year: 1999

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Dr.Dana Trotter
(262) 637-1000
5439 Durand Ave # 103
Racine, WI
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Rheumatologist
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Accepting New Patients: Yes
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3.2, out of 5 based on 10, reviews.

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Kurt Robert Oelke, MD
2500 W Layton Ave
Milwaukee, WI
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Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
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Male
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Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1997

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Daniel H Rosler, MD
(414) 649-3771
2900 W Oklahoma Ave
Milwaukee, WI
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Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
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Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Auto De Guadalajara, Fac De Med, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Graduation Year: 1985

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James John Nocton, MD
(414) 266-6700
PO Box 1997
Milwaukee, WI
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Rheumatology
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Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1987

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Savitha B Kalya, MD
Milwaukee, WI
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Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
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Female
Education
Medical School: Jss Med Coll, Mysore Univ, Mysore, Karnataka, India
Graduation Year: 1995

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Dana Trotter
(262) 637-1000
5439 Durand Ave
Racine, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Treating Sciatica

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By Elizabeth Marglin

If your leg cramps and you feel pain, burning, tingling, or discomfort that runs from your lower back down the back of either leg, a disk low in your spine may be pressing on the nerve that runs through that area. Called sciatica, this condition can last for weeks, although most people eventually recover with rest. The ancient technique of reflexology offers an easy, effective method to loosen sciatica’s grip and speed your recovery.

Reflexology, which traces back 5,000 years to its roots in China and Egypt, applies the mystical notion of “As above, so below” to the human body. The basic idea: Various areas on the feet, called reflexes, mirror anatomical patterns throughout the body, so applying different types of pressure to them stimulates the relaxation response in their corresponding body parts. Dubious? Devote a few minutes to focused footwork and see how good you feel.

Kevin Kunz, coauthor of Reflexology: Health at Your Fingertips (DK Penguin, 2003) recommends the following treatment for sciatica:

• Roll it out.
To lessen tension in the foot itself, roll the foot over a tennis ball, a foot roller, or a special foot massage ball while standing.

• Unwind your ankles.
Cup the ankle with your thumb resting just below the outside anklebone, and rotate the foot a full 360 degrees a few times in either direction. This exercise loosens the ankles, which function as shock absorbers for the entire body—and any reduction in the amount of ankle stress might also ease a tight back.

• Knead your heel.
The heel holds the reflexes for the tailbone–lower back region, the origin of sciatica. The reflex for the sciatic nerve runs horizontally across the heel. Make a loose fist and knead your heel with your knuckles to stimulate the nerve and your lower back.

• Follow your crease.
The region around the outside anklebone also relates directly to the sciatic nerve. Walk one or two of your fingers in the crease below the outer ankle located between the Achilles tendon and the anklebone itself. Using the finger walking technique just under the anklebone on the inside of the foot also helps alleviate hip problems.

The trick to reflexology, says Kunz, is consistency. Practice these exercises for a few minutes several times a day, and you just might say good-bye to your sciatic woes. But even if it doesn’t provide an instant cure, your feet will certainly appreciate the attention.

Author: Elizabeth Marglin

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