Sciatica Treatment Meadville PA

If your leg cramps and you feel pain, burning, tingling, or discomfort that runs from your lower back down the back of either leg, a disk low in your spine may be pressing on the nerve that runs through that area. Called sciatica, this condition can last for weeks, although most people eventually recover with rest. The ancient technique of reflexology offers an easy, effective method to loosen sciatica’s grip and speed your recovery.

Gerald E LaRochelle
(814) 337-8532
1012 Water St
Meadville, PA
Specialty
Rheumatology

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DeBorah Co
(412) 856-9142
2580 Haymaker Rd
Monroeville, PA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

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Marguerite L McGarvey
(215) 657-6776
2400 Maryland Rd
Willow Grove, PA
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Domingo G Ottonello, MD
(412) 673-8110
500 Naysmith Rd
North Versailles, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Nac De Tucuman, Fac De Med, San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina
Graduation Year: 1967
Hospital
Hospital: Upmc McKeesport Hosp, Mc Keesport, Pa

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Angela Mary Stupi, MD
(412) 687-0301
1211 Wilmington Ave
New Castle, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Pa, Philadelphia Pa 19129
Graduation Year: 1976

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Farooq Hassan
(724) 588-1082
30 Conneaut Lake Rd
Greenville, PA
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Daniel Armin Kietz, MD
(412) 692-5081
3705 5th Ave
Pittsburgh, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Univ, Med Fak, Frankfurt, Ger (407-23 Pr 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1994

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Rawan Hani Jumean, MD
3300 Henry Ave Ste 220H
Philadelphia, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Saba Univ Sch Of Med, Saba, Netherland Antilles
Graduation Year: 1999

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Kimberly Joy Hamilton, MD
(717) 851-6236
292 Saint Charles Way
York, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1996

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Peter F Pepe
(814) 234-8800
1850 E Park Ave
State College, PA
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Treating Sciatica

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By Elizabeth Marglin

If your leg cramps and you feel pain, burning, tingling, or discomfort that runs from your lower back down the back of either leg, a disk low in your spine may be pressing on the nerve that runs through that area. Called sciatica, this condition can last for weeks, although most people eventually recover with rest. The ancient technique of reflexology offers an easy, effective method to loosen sciatica’s grip and speed your recovery.

Reflexology, which traces back 5,000 years to its roots in China and Egypt, applies the mystical notion of “As above, so below” to the human body. The basic idea: Various areas on the feet, called reflexes, mirror anatomical patterns throughout the body, so applying different types of pressure to them stimulates the relaxation response in their corresponding body parts. Dubious? Devote a few minutes to focused footwork and see how good you feel.

Kevin Kunz, coauthor of Reflexology: Health at Your Fingertips (DK Penguin, 2003) recommends the following treatment for sciatica:

• Roll it out.
To lessen tension in the foot itself, roll the foot over a tennis ball, a foot roller, or a special foot massage ball while standing.

• Unwind your ankles.
Cup the ankle with your thumb resting just below the outside anklebone, and rotate the foot a full 360 degrees a few times in either direction. This exercise loosens the ankles, which function as shock absorbers for the entire body—and any reduction in the amount of ankle stress might also ease a tight back.

• Knead your heel.
The heel holds the reflexes for the tailbone–lower back region, the origin of sciatica. The reflex for the sciatic nerve runs horizontally across the heel. Make a loose fist and knead your heel with your knuckles to stimulate the nerve and your lower back.

• Follow your crease.
The region around the outside anklebone also relates directly to the sciatic nerve. Walk one or two of your fingers in the crease below the outer ankle located between the Achilles tendon and the anklebone itself. Using the finger walking technique just under the anklebone on the inside of the foot also helps alleviate hip problems.

The trick to reflexology, says Kunz, is consistency. Practice these exercises for a few minutes several times a day, and you just might say good-bye to your sciatic woes. But even if it doesn’t provide an instant cure, your feet will certainly appreciate the attention.

Author: Elizabeth Marglin

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