Cold Prevention Crestwood KY

Too much blowing can leave your poor nose red and chafed. Keep an aloe plant on your windowsill (all it needs is weekly watering and lots of sun). When your nose hurts, snip off a leaf and slit it open; scoop out the gel and dab it on irritated spots. Bonus: Indoor plants act as living air purifiers to absorb pollutants and ease breathing.

Lowe Chiropractic & Wellness Center
(502) 245-7334
10306 Shelbyville Rd
Louisville, KY

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Evergreen Animal Hospital
(502) 244-2068
11618 Shelbyville Rd.
Louisville , KY

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Julene B. Samuels
(502) 897-9411
6400 Dutchmans Parkway
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Cosmetic Surgery
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Anthony Alexander M. D.
(812) 523-3700
1730 Williamsburg Road
Jeffersonville, IN
Business
The Pain Management and Rehabilitation Center
Specialties
Pain Management, Nuroanesthiology
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: We accept most insurance plans and Medicare
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes

Additional Information
Member Organizations: Diplomat of the American Society of Anesthesiologist and American Board of Pain Medicine.
Awards: America's Top Physician Award, Consumer Research Council of America 2003, 2006, 2008
Languages Spoken: English

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A Frances Brennan, MD
(502) 589-3844
250 E Liberty St
Louisville, KY
Business
Louisville Medical Associates
Specialties
Internal Medicine

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Dynamic Chiropractic & Rehab
(502) 426-9200
3707 Chamberlain Ln #101
Louisville, KY

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Bowersox Vision Center
(502) 647-3937
403 Washington St
Shelbyville, KY

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Sharp Chiropracitc
(502) 239-3993
8015 Bardstown Rd
Louisville, KY

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Pets Plus Veterinary Care Center
(502) 239-7387
6017 Bardstown Rd.
Louisville, KY

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East Broadway Chiropractic and Rehab
(502) 681-6800
418 E Broadway
Louisville, KY

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Treating Cold Symptoms

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By Brooke Benjamin

We know: You thought you’d be safe from cold and flu season this year. You ate your immune-boosting sweet potatoes, got plenty of sleep, and hit the echinacea at the first sign of a scratchy throat. But it’s called the common cold for a reason: The National Institutes of Health report that more than 200 viruses cause colds and 1 billion colds strike people every year in the US. No matter how healthy your habits, chances are the sniffles and sneezes will catch you. But over-the-counter drugs can be bad medicine. Antihistamines and cough suppressants can make you drowsy, while decongestants can cause dizziness, loss of appetite, and even insomnia (the last thing you need when you’re under the weather). So what should you do when you’re stuck on the couch next to a mountain of tissues that rivals Kilimanjaro? Give those annoying symptoms the cold shoulder with this feel-better guide.

Relieve a raw nose. Too much blowing can leave your poor nose red and chafed. Keep an aloe plant on your windowsill (all it needs is weekly watering and lots of sun). When your nose hurts, snip off a leaf and slit it open; scoop out the gel and dab it on irritated spots. Bonus: Indoor plants act as living air purifiers to absorb pollutants and ease breathing.

Curb congestion. Try the wet sock treatment, suggests Melody Hart, ND, a naturopath in Geneva, Illinois. Warm your feet in a tub of hot water; meanwhile, soak a pair of cotton socks in ice-cold water. Take your feet out of the tub, put on the cold socks, and then layer on a pair of dry, thick wool ones. The “threat” of the damp socks makes your body think it’s under attack. Your immune system responds by initiating the fever response and sending out white blood cells, which increases blood circulation and decreases congestion in the upper respiratory passages, head, and throat. Keep the socks on for three hours.

Soothe a sore throat.
“Brew tea that contains slippery elm bark, such as Traditional Medicinals Organic Throat Coat, and drink four to six cups daily,” says Kathi Kemper, MD, of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Native Americans have used this tree bark for centuries because it contains mucilage, a gelatinous substance that coats the throat and reduces irritation. Or look for slippery elm bark as an active ingredient in lozenges—sucking stimulates saliva production to keep the throat lubricated.

Help a headache. Rub Tiger Balm or another topical, menthol salve on your forehead and the base of your skull when symptoms begin. “The menthol triggers nerves that override the pain signal from your headache,” advises Jacob Teitelbaum, MD, medical director of the nationwide Fibromyalgia and Fatigue Centers.

Leave a fever. Rethink your knee-jerk reaction to pop Tylenol to reduce a temperature. “A fever is part of the healing process because it delivers heat and white blood cells (your immune system’s defense team) to the infection,” says Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, a...

Author: Brooke Benjamin

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