Cholesterol Specialist Boston MA

Trans fat is created when food manufacturers make liquid vegetable oils solid by adding hydrogen (hence the name hydrogenated oil). They do this to increase the shelf life of the product, because trans fat takes longer than vegetable oil to spoil.

Andrew S Greenberg, MD
(617) 556-3144
711 Washington St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1981

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Boston Medical Center
(617) 414-2080
850 Harrison Avenue, Yawkey ACC-2
Boston, MA
Services
Preventive Medicine, Pediatrics, Pain Management, Nutrition, Mind/Body Medicine, Meditation, Healthy Aging, Gynecology, Fitness/Exercise, Family Practice
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

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George Mandler
(617) 989-8658
1520 Tremont Street
Boston, MA
Company
Chi Wellness Clinic
Industry
Acupuncturist, Herbalist, Nutritionist

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Ronenn Roubenoff, MD
(617) 444-1537
40 Landsdowne St
Cambridge, MA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch, Chicago Il 60611
Graduation Year: 1983

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David Rush, MD
(617) 547-8467
68 Foster St
Cambridge, MA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Harvard Med Sch, Boston Ma 02115
Graduation Year: 1959

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Joel Bernard Mason, MD
(617) 556-3194
711 Washington St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1981

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John Frederick Thompson, MD
(617) 956-0135
88 E Newton St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1977

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Trustees Of Boston University
(617) 353-2721
635 Commonwealth Ave
Boston, MA
 
Farhat Nicolas Homsy, MD
(617) 232-9916
70 Parker Hill Ave
Boston, MA
Gender
Male
Languages
French, Arabic
Education
Medical School: Univ De Nancy I, Uer A Et B Med, Vandoeuvreles-Nancy, France
Graduation Year: 1976
Hospital
Hospital: New England Baptist Hospital, Roxbury Xing, Ma; Faulkner Hosp, Boston, Ma

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Sheldon Randall, MD
(781) 306-6166
170 Governors Ave
Medford, MA
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Centro De Estudios Univ Xochicalco Aa, Cuernavaca, Morelos(1980)
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Faulkner Hosp, Boston, Ma; Hallmark Health -Medford Lawr, Medford, Ma

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Trans Fat

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By Lisa Lanzano, RD

Q. How can some food labels proclaim “0 grams trans fat” on the package and still list hydrogenated oils in the ingredients?

A. This is a great question, and one that confuses many people. If a food lists “partially hydrogenated” or “fully hydrogenated” oils in its ingredients, then it definitely contains trans fats, despite the “0 grams trans fat” claim.

Trans fat is created when food manufacturers make liquid vegetable oils solid by adding hydrogen (hence the name hydrogenated oil). They do this to increase the shelf life of the product, because trans fat takes longer than vegetable oil to spoil. Unfortunately, this process changes the natural structure of the oil, making it harmful to our bodies. A wealth of research has shown that consuming trans fat significantly increases your risk of cardiovascular disease by raising your total and LDL cholesterol (the bad kind), and possibly decreasing your HDL cholesterol (the good kind). Eating trans fat-loaded foods also increases belly fat, a sign of metabolic syndrome.

So how can labels promise “0 grams trans fat” when the food has hydrogenated oils? The reason lies in the rules set forth by the FDA. When a product contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving, the number on the nutrition label can be rounded down to zero. But this doesn’t make the product free of trans fat. That half gram per serving is still there. If you eat just one serving, even the FDA would have to admit you’re consuming trans fat. Couple that little sleight of hand with the fact that most Americans routinely eat more than the suggested serving size, and you’ve got two important reasons to choose your foods wisely.

Your best bet is to avoid trans fat altogether. It most commonly hides in cookies, crackers, microwave popcorn, margarine, and other processed foods. The next time you see a product boasting “0 grams trans fat,” check for hydrogenated oils in the ingredients. If they’re listed, steer clear of the food, and remember the old adage: caveat emptor, let the buyer beware.

What to Do?
1. When buying a new food, look at the Nutrition Facts box. Under “Total Fat,” you’ll see a listing for trans fat. If the number is greater than 0—be it 1 gram, 2 grams, or 20 grams—go to step three.

2. Now read the Ingredients box (usually below the Nutrition Facts box). If you find “hydrogenated oils,” “partially hydrogenated oils,” or “fully hydrogenated oils,” go to step three. If you don’t see these listed, the product is free of trans fat and fine to eat.

3. Don’t eat this food—it has trans fat. Check out organic or natural-food alternatives—they probably taste better, too!

Lisa Lanzano, RD, of Boulder, Colorado, offers consultations, phone coaching, and cooking classes ( eatwellfeelgood.com ).

Author: Lisa Lanzano, RD

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