Mood Disorder Specialists Grand Forks ND

A positive mood is more expansive, sees the larger picture and tends to make more associations. Sad people, on the other hand, tend to stick to the facts, pay attention to details, and use more item'specific processing.

Muhammad Asghar ali Shah
(701) 795-3000
151 S 4th St
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Ellen K Feldman
(701) 780-6697
860 S Columbia Rd
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Keith J Erickson
(701) 775-2500
1451 44th Ave S
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Ashok K Bansal
(701) 780-6697
860 S Columbia Rd
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Jeffrey Row
(701) 775-2500
1451 44th Ave S
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Whalen, Jonathan, Phd - Lipp Carlson Lommen & Witucki
(701) 746-8376
2808 17th Ave S
Grand Forks, ND
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

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Thomas Peterson
(701) 775-2500
1451 44th Ave S
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Jacob Kerbeshian
(701) 780-6697
860 S Columbia Rd
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Psychiatry

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The Stadter Center
(701) 772-2500
1451 44th Ave S
Grand Forks, ND
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Osteopath (DO)

Data Provided by:
Harold E. Randall
(701) 775-4192
2698 S 35th Street
Grand Forks, ND
Services
Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Behavioral Health Intervention involving Life Threatening/Terminal Disease, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Crisis Intervention or Disaster Intervention
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: U No Dakota
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-14

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The Upside of Sadness

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Have trouble remembering things? Maybe you’re just too happy. A recent University of Virginia study found that sad people remembered words more accurately than those who are lovin’ life. The study tested 100 undergraduates who were exposed to two different mood-inducing classical music selections to evoke either happiness (Mozart) or sadness (Mahler).

Once their moods had been altered, the students were shown lists of words that they were then asked to recall. The researchers found that subjects who were feeling cheerier were more likely to lapse into “relational processing,” which means that as they listened they made associations with the words and thought about bigger issues rather than the specifics of the task. Consequently this group’s test scores were lower than their gloomier compatriots.

“A positive mood is more expansive, sees the larger picture and tends to make more associations,” says study author Justin Storbeck. “Sad people, on the other hand, tend to stick to the facts, pay attention to details, and use more item-specific processing.”

The study even puts a positive spin on sadness. “We used to think about negative emotions as being dysfunctional,” says Storbeck, “but sometimes they can be beneficial, depending on the task.”

Elizabeth Marglin

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