Communication Counselor Freeport IL

Part of NVC is to express these four pieces of information very clearly, whether verbally or by other means. The other aspect of this communication consists of receiving the same four pieces of information from others.

Shahina Jafry
(815) 599-7300
421 W Exchange St
Freeport, IL
Specialty
Psychiatry

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New Horizons Counseling Center
(815) 235-6171
34 N Whistler Ave
Freeport, IL
Industry
Mental Health Professional

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Brian LeBaron
(815) 541-4207
Freeport, IL
Practice Areas
Career Development, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

FHN Family Counseling Center
(815) 599-7300
421 W Exchange
Freeport, IL
 
Rockwell Taylor Phd
(815) 232-9050
660 W Stephenson
Freeport, IL
 
Fhn Family Counseling Center
(815) 599-7300
1133 W Stephenson St
Freeport, IL
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

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Sandra Geiseman
(815) 801-4673
Freeport, IL
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

New Horizons Counseling Center
(815) 235-6171
34 N Whistler Avenue
Freeport, IL
 
Sue A Clark
(815) 235-7076
717 West, STEPHENSON
Freeport, IL
 
Rockwell, Dr. Taylor, PhD, MA
(815) 232-9050
773 West Lincoln
Freeport, IL
 
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The Non-Violent Communication Process

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To arrive at a mutual desire to give from the heart, we focus the light of consciousness on four areas—referred to as the four components of the NVC model.

First, we observe what is actually happening in a situation: what are we observing others saying or doing that is either enriching or not enriching our life? The trick is to be able to articulate this observation without introducing any judgment or evaluation—to simply say what people are doing that we either like or don’t like.

Four components of NVC:
1. observation
2. feeling
3. needs
4. request

Next, we state how we feel when we observe this action: are we hurt, scared, joyful, amused, irritated, etc.? And thirdly, we say what needs of ours are connected to the feelings we have identified. An awareness of these three components is present when we use NVC to clearly and honestly express how we are.

For example, a mother might express these three pieces to her teenage son by saying, “Felix, when I see two balls of soiled socks under the coffee table and another three next to the TV, I feel irritated because I am needing more order in the rooms which we share in common.”

She would follow immediately with the fourth component—a very specific request: “Would you be willing to put your socks in your room or in the washing machine?” This fourth component addresses what we are wanting from the other person that would enrich our lives or make life more wonderful for us.

Thus, part of NVC is to express these four pieces of information very clearly, whether verbally or by other means. The other aspect of this communication consists of receiving the same four pieces of information from others. We connect with them by first sensing what they are observing, feeling, and needing, and then discover what would enrich their lives by receiving the fourth piece, their request. As we keep our attention focused on the areas mentioned, and help others do likewise, we establish a flow of communication, back and forth, until compassion manifests naturally: what I am observing, feeling, and needing; what I am requesting to enrich my life; what you are observing, feeling, and needing; what you are requesting to enrich your life.

Source: Marshall Rosenberg, from CNVC.org

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