Art Therapy Franklinton LA

Once seen strictly as deleterious to health—or at least a sign of unhealthy tendencies, particularly in the psychological realm—creative pursuits now appear to be beneficial to mind, body, and psyche. New research suggests creativity can improve memory by strengthening brain cell connections, boost morale and coping skills by changing the way we respond to problems, and even bolster immunity by increasing the body’s levels of natural killer cells and T lymphocytes.

Maxima Group Behavioral Services
(985) 795-1704
1001 15th Ave
Franklinton, LA
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Ann J Arretteig
(985) 730-6705
400 Memphis St
Bogalusa, LA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
David John Sauls
(985) 732-6610
619 Willis Ave
Bogalusa, LA
Specialty
Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Northwest Cmhc Llc
(318) 670-7463
2121 Fairfield Ave
Shreveport, LA
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Ollie S Carter
(318) 362-3339
4800 South Grand St
Monroe, LA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Family Counseling Center the
(985) 732-5580
302 Richmond St
Bogalusa, LA
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Christopher W Lartigue
(985) 730-6705
433 Plaza St
Bogalusa, LA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Magnolia Behavioral Healthcare
(985) 735-1750
1640 South Columbia Street
Bogalusa, LA
Specialty
Intensive Outpatient Program

Craig Joseph Troxclair
(504) 942-8358
719 Elysian Fields Ave
New Orleans, LA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Chadha Medical Clinic
(337) 786-5007
124 W 4th St
Dequincy, LA
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Osteopath (DO), Personal Trainer

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The Healthy Palette

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By Deirdre Shevlin BellIn

In 1888, painter Vincent Van Gogh, in a manic rage, tried to attack his friend with a razor blade. Later in the day, he severed a piece of his own ear. That landed him in a hospital, and then a mental institution. Shortly after his release, Van Gogh shot himself dead. Although the last two years of his life were nothing if not troubled, during that period he produced some of his most brilliant artwork.
Van Gogh represents the quintessential mad genius. Since pen first touched paper and brush canvas, people have associated his type of tragic figure with creativity. Even Aristotle weighed in, saying, “Those who become eminent in philosophy, politics, poetry, and the arts have all tendencies towards melancholia.” Recently, however, the notion of creativity’s effects on health has changed.
Once seen strictly as deleterious to health—or at least a sign of unhealthy tendencies, particularly in the psychological realm—creative pursuits now appear to be beneficial to mind, body, and psyche. New research suggests creativity can improve memory by strengthening brain cell connections, boost morale and coping skills by changing the way we respond to problems, and even bolster immunity by increasing the body’s levels of natural killer cells and T lymphocytes. And for those with special needs, creative outlets can be particularly helpful. Caretakers and therapists now use art activities to encourage the development of children with disabilities, to heal those with eating disorders, and to give a voice to older folks. As research in the field continues, the definitions of creativity and its many potential uses in healthcare expand almost endlessly.

Kids get creative
Because children tend naturally toward uninhibited, creative expression, artistic therapies can help them work through problems when more traditional therapies fail. Janet Tubbs, author of Creative Therapy for Children With Autism, ADHD, and Asperger’s: Using Artistic Creativity to Reach, Teach, and Touch Our Children (Square One Publishers, 2007) has used creativity to help children reach their full potential for more than 20 years. It didn’t take her long to see how music, art, and puppetry could help children with developmental disorders, too. That led her to develop a program for bringing creativity into the lives of children with autism, attention-deficit–hyperactivity disorder, and Asperger’s Syndrome.
These disorders—and many others—affect children physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually, according to Tubbs, and art can help them integrate all those aspects of their being. “There really is nothing that brings all of them together more rapidly or effectively than the creative arts,” she says.

Author: Deirdre Shevlin BellIn

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