Yoga Studios Dallas TX

Yoga is a great form of exercise that combines mind, body and spirit. There are many different types of yoga styles and it’s really fun to try several different yoga postures and styles to alternate your workouts. Pleases scroll down to learn more about the benefits of yoga and get access to all the related products and services in Dallas, TX listed below including yoga studios.

Alive and Healthy Institute
(972) 774-0221
14114 Dallas Parkway, Suite 260
Dallas, TX
Services
Yoga, Wellness Training, Supplements, Stress Management, Rehabilitation Therapy, Psychotherapy, Preventive Medicine, Physical Therapy, Physical Exercise, Pain Management, Nutrition, Movement Therapy, Mind/Body Medicine, Meditation, Massage Therapy, Homeopathy, Herbal Medicine, Healthy Aging, Fitness/Exercise, Family Practice, Energy Medicine, Cognitive Therapy, Coaching, Breathwork, Brain Longevity, Biofeedback, Ayurveda, Arthritis
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Dynamic Power Yoga PLUS!
(972) 934-3905
4951 Airport Parkway
Addison, TX
Yoga Styles
HOT Power Yoga

Keva Larthridge-Mack
(972) 999-0127
PO Box 1752
Grand Prairie, TX
Yoga Styles
Hatha

Surya Center for Yoga
(972) 304-8484
848 S. Denton Tap Road #250
Coppell, TX
Yoga Styles
Hatha/restorative/Anusara

Mind Body Connection
(214) 395-4065
4714 Scenic Drive (Home Address)
Rowlett, TX
Yoga Styles
Hatha

Alive and Healthy Institute
(888) 414-9500
14114 Dallas Parkway
Dallas, TX
Yoga Styles
Ayurveda, Meditation and Holistic Health

Yoga Product - See website
(972) 822-4468
2804 Waterford Dr.
Irving, TX
Yoga Styles
Sivananda, Crescent Moon

Yoga Synergy Spa & Wellness Center- Firewheel
(214) 684-5060
395 Cedar Sage Dr
Garland, TX
Yoga Styles
Eclectic blend of Hatha Yoga, Vinyasa fl

Pranaa Ayurveda Spa & Yoga
(972) 608-0402
Lakeside Market
Plano, TX
Yoga Styles
Hatha, Vinyasa, Viniyoga, Kripalu

Bible Enlightened Book
(972) 231-1044
4300 N. Josey Lane
Carrollton, TX
Yoga Styles
Sahaja Yoga

Data Provided by:

Yoga

Provided by: 

Yoga can be a powerful healing tool for overcoming back pain. But there are times when your practice can do more harm than good. “Too often, students don’t back off a pose until there’s pain,” says Jamie Elmer, a yoga instructor in Boulder, Colorado. “Hurting even just alittle bit is a sign that you have to change something.” Elmer challenges students to answer this question: Why are you coming to yoga? “Are you coming for a distraction from something else? That’s what TV is for. A yoga practice without mindfulness can lead to injury quickly.”
If you have a history of lower back pain, keep these do’s and don’ts in mind when you practice, says Elmer:

DO vary the intensity of your practice. “If we do anything repetitively, day after day, and we haven’t built up the internal strength for that activity, the body won’t be ready for it, and injury will result,” says Elmer. Like any type of exercise, mix up the style of yoga you practice. If you do a vigorous, Ashtanga class one day, seek out a more meditative and calming class the next, so you’re not repeating strenuous movements too often.

DON’T go into any pose to your fullest range of motion. “When you’re in that kind of extreme, you’re not using muscle control,” she says. The result? Risky joint compression in your hips, knees, and spine.

DO use your abdominal muscles and bend your knees when going into a forward bend to prevent overstretching in your lower back.

DO use your abs and keep your legs strong in back-bending poses, including cobra and upward-facing dog.

DON’T twist with a rounded spine. “More important than how deeply you can twist is how long your spine is when you do,” says Elmer.

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...