GERD Specialist Honolulu HI

While the true cause is a matter of some debate (suspected culprits range from diet and lifestyle choices to genetics or structural problems in the digestive system—see "Plumbing Problems" , conventional medicine has met the disease largely with the same approach for decades, prescribing medication to either neutralize or minimize stomach acid.

Rodney Mitsuo Kazama, MD
(808) 526-0033
1380 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hi John A Burns Sch Of Med, Honolulu Hi 96822
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Kagehito Hayashi, MD
(808) 522-4233
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Herbert Lao Lim, MD
(808) 497-7245
1380 Lusitana St Queen's PO Box 1 Ste 801
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hi John A Burns Sch Of Med, Honolulu Hi 96822
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
George Bennett Lisehora, MD
(808) 524-1856
1380 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Stephen K Buto
(808) 524-7676
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Garson K Lee
(808) 538-9011
1301 Punchbowl St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Mari Ikeguchi
(808) 522-4000
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Roland B Ter, MD
(808) 522-4233
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Queensland, Fac Of Med, Herston, Queensland, Australia
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Herbert Lao Lim, MD
(808) 523-1658
1380 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Chikara Ohtake
(808) 945-3719
1441 Kapiolani Blvd. #2000
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Taming GERD

Provided by: 

By Lisa Marshall

It’s a sensation that more than half of us experience now and then, often rising up in our chest after a day of overindulging in Grandma’s favorite recipes or a night of spicy food. But for an increasing number of Americans, the hot, painful rush of heartburn has morphed from an occasional distraction into an almost daily occurrence that can impair sleep, sour breath, lead to chronic upper respiratory infections, and, if left unchecked, increase the chance of cancer of the esophagus eightfold.

According to the American College of Gastroenterology, as many as 15 million Americans suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a chronic condition that results when caustic stomach juices regularly rise out of the stomach into the more sensitive esophagus, producing a chronic burning sensation.

While the true cause is a matter of some debate (suspected culprits range from diet and lifestyle choices to genetics or structural problems in the digestive system—see “Plumbing Problems” , conventional medicine has met the disease largely with the same approach for decades, prescribing medication to either neutralize or minimize stomach acid.

First came acid neutralizers, like Tums, that offered some relief but caused diarrhea and constipation. Then came H2 antagonists, like Zantac, which only partially suppressed the acid and were recommended only for temporary relief. Then, in 1988, came proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), a potent new class of drugs that suppress stomach acid production for more than 24 hours and are commonly prescribed for long-term use.

Since their invention, the PPIs have become the second most popular class of prescription drug in the US, according to the market research firm IMS Health, bringing in more than $12.5 billion in sales in 2004 alone. Thanks to a $260-million-per year advertising campaign that has made the “little purple pill” a household word, AstraZeneca’s Nexium is now the fastest growing drug in America. And because its pre-cursor, Prilosec, is now available over-the-counter, many are popping the pills without ever consulting a doctor.

That concerns David Scrimgeour, LAc, a practitioner of oriental medicine in Boulder, Colorado.

“Any time you disrupt a necessary bodily function (like acid production) you are going to have issues down the road,” says Scrimgeour.

A growing body of research has shed light on the long-term risks of using PPIs—increased susceptibility to infection and an inability to absorb nutrients being two—and many in the health care community now urge patients to steer clear of them and try a more holistic approach instead.

“These drugs are not dealing with the root of the problem,” says Scrimgeour. “If you can get everything back into balance, get their diet right, and cut down the stress, you can cure this.”

The value of stomach acid

Anil Minocha, MD, director of digestive diseases and nutrition at University of Mississippi Medical Center, says that PPIs have prove...

Author: Lisa Marshall

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...