Tendonitis Specialist Claremore OK

Tennis elbow is a form of tendonitis that affects the fleshy region at the top of the forearm, the home of numerous muscles and tendons that control the hands and fingers. Both the large intestine and the “triple heater channels” of acupuncture, which regulate bowel function and metabolism, also run through this area.

Raul Jose A Romea, MD
(405) 737-6600
2801 Parklawn Dr Fl 5
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The Philippines, Coll Of Med, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1992
Hospital
Hospital: St Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City, Ok
Group Practice: Orthopaedic & Reconstructive

Data Provided by:
Petrina Joslin
(918) 683-0753
350 S 40th St
Muskogee, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
James McKay
(918) 748-8024
1430 Terrace Dr
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Dr.William Schnitz
(405) 949-6481
5701 N Portland Ave # 210
Oklahoma City, OK
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1987
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Hospital: Integris Baptist Med Ctr, Oklahoma City, Ok
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.1, out of 5 based on 6, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Alan Lee Martin, MD
(918) 748-7540
1919 S Wheeling Ave Ste 706
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok; St Francis Hospital, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Pssi

Data Provided by:
Ana I Quintero, MD
(405) 271-6655
825 NE 13th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ De Ciencias Med San Juan Bautista, Hato Rey Pr 00917
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: Childrens Hosp Of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Ok
Group Practice: Department Of Medicine Univ Of Ok Health Sciences Ctr; Ou Physicians

Data Provided by:
Linda Ann Zacharias
(405) 844-4978
1701 Renaissance Blvd
Edmond, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Christine Ellen Codding, MD
(405) 737-6600
1044 SW 44th St Ste 620
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Petrina Joslin, MD
(918) 683-0753
350 S 40th St
Muskogee, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Nancy A Brown, DO
(405) 364-8501
2120 McKown Dr Ste B
Norman, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Ok State Univ, Coll Of Osteo Med, Tulsa, Ok 74107
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Tame Your Tendonitis

Provided by: 

By Robert Keller, CA

Q. I was recently diagnosed with tennis elbow, and I don’t even play tennis! What can I do?

A. First off, don’t be surprised—tennis often has nothing to do with tennis elbow. Any repetitive movement or strain on the forearm—from playing tennis to painting your house to typing—can trigger the condition, but poor circulation or inflammation are most likely the underlying causes.

Tennis elbow is a form of tendonitis that affects the fleshy region at the top of the forearm, the home of numerous muscles and tendons that control the hands and fingers. Both the large intestine and the “triple heater channels” of acupuncture, which regulate bowel function and metabolism, also run through this area. These channels are easily affected by the imbalance that Chinese medicine calls depressive liver heat, which causes inflammation and swelling of the surrounding tissues.

Acupuncture treats tendonitis very effectively, and I suggest you give it a try. In my own practice, I see people twice a week for three weeks, and then once weekly for another three weeks. This usually solves the problem (at least by 80 percent); any remaining pain can be treated less intensively over another month or so. I often give patients Chinese herbal topicals such as Plaster for Bruise—which you can find in Asian markets and health-food stores—to apply just before bedtime. These contain anti-inflammatory herbs such as mint and cinnamon. In the meantime, try these self-care remedies:

Take an anti-inflammatory supplement like ginger, turmeric, or myrrh—or even better, add the first two to your food.

Pick up a combination antioxidant remedy containing quercetin and bromelain to reduce swelling and pain, improve blood circulation, and neutralize metabolism waste products.

Add nutrient-rich berries and dark-green and orange vegetables to your diet—these foods help heal damaged tissue.

Steer clear of coffee, sugar, and alcohol, all of which can aggravate the liver and make things worse.

Rest your arm muscles. If you keep using your forearm, the condition might drag on for months.

Use a support wrap during the day but avoid tight bands that could immobilize the tendons.

Avoid feeling cold, which can impede blood flow to the tissues.

Begin strengthening and stretching exercises once the pain has eased. I recommend using a gyroscope, which you can find at any sporting goods store. This low-impact device lengthens every muscle in the forearm when used for just five minutes, twice a day. For two more simple exercises, see “Quick Exercises for Tendonitis” below.

Finally, nothing damages the liver more than stress. Ten minutes of some form of meditation each day can reduce stress’ negative effects.

Robert Keller, CA, practices acupuncture and Chinese medicine in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

Quick Exercises for Tendonitis
The more often you find time to fit these stretches into your workday, says Corte Madera, California, chiropractor Pali Cooper, the bette...

Author: Robert Keller

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...