Tendonitis Specialist Chambersburg PA

Tennis elbow is a form of tendonitis that affects the fleshy region at the top of the forearm, the home of numerous muscles and tendons that control the hands and fingers. Both the large intestine and the “triple heater channels” of acupuncture, which regulate bowel function and metabolism, also run through this area.

Kevin Ray Clawson, DO
(717) 243-7598
Shippensburg, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Philadelphia Coll Of Osteo Med, Philadelphia Pa 19131
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Timothy R Howard, DO
2028 Green St
Philadelphia, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Philadelphia Coll Of Osteo Med, Philadelphia Pa 19131
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided by:
John G Fort, MD
(908) 901-9988
37 Lily Pond Ln
Chester Springs, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ De Valencia, Fac De Med, Valencia,
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Domingo G Ottonello, MD
(412) 673-8110
500 Naysmith Rd
North Versailles, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Nac De Tucuman, Fac De Med, San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina
Graduation Year: 1967
Hospital
Hospital: Upmc McKeesport Hosp, Mc Keesport, Pa

Data Provided by:
William T Ayoub
(814) 231-4560
200 Scenery Dr
State College, PA
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
William L Kanenson, MD
(717) 761-3875
890 Poplar Church Rd Ste 508
Camp Hill, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ,
Graduation Year: 1955

Data Provided by:
Nancy Jane Walker, MD
933 E Haverford Rd
Bryn Mawr, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Mc Master Univ, Sch Of Med, Hamilton, Ont, Canada
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided by:
Martin D Blidner, MD
(570) 824-7117
150 Mundy St
Wilkes Barre, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The East, Ramon Magsaysay Mem Med Ctr, Quezon City
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
Martin Jan Bergman, MD
(610) 521-1701
8 Morton Ave Ste 304
Ridley Park, PA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Languages
Italian
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Crozer-Chester Comm Hosp, Chester, Pa; Taylor Hospital, Ridley Park, Pa

Data Provided by:
Christine A Phillips
(717) 633-1978
795 Cherry Tree Court Suite 1
Hanover, PA
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
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Tame Your Tendonitis

Provided by: 

By Robert Keller, CA

Q. I was recently diagnosed with tennis elbow, and I don’t even play tennis! What can I do?

A. First off, don’t be surprised—tennis often has nothing to do with tennis elbow. Any repetitive movement or strain on the forearm—from playing tennis to painting your house to typing—can trigger the condition, but poor circulation or inflammation are most likely the underlying causes.

Tennis elbow is a form of tendonitis that affects the fleshy region at the top of the forearm, the home of numerous muscles and tendons that control the hands and fingers. Both the large intestine and the “triple heater channels” of acupuncture, which regulate bowel function and metabolism, also run through this area. These channels are easily affected by the imbalance that Chinese medicine calls depressive liver heat, which causes inflammation and swelling of the surrounding tissues.

Acupuncture treats tendonitis very effectively, and I suggest you give it a try. In my own practice, I see people twice a week for three weeks, and then once weekly for another three weeks. This usually solves the problem (at least by 80 percent); any remaining pain can be treated less intensively over another month or so. I often give patients Chinese herbal topicals such as Plaster for Bruise—which you can find in Asian markets and health-food stores—to apply just before bedtime. These contain anti-inflammatory herbs such as mint and cinnamon. In the meantime, try these self-care remedies:

Take an anti-inflammatory supplement like ginger, turmeric, or myrrh—or even better, add the first two to your food.

Pick up a combination antioxidant remedy containing quercetin and bromelain to reduce swelling and pain, improve blood circulation, and neutralize metabolism waste products.

Add nutrient-rich berries and dark-green and orange vegetables to your diet—these foods help heal damaged tissue.

Steer clear of coffee, sugar, and alcohol, all of which can aggravate the liver and make things worse.

Rest your arm muscles. If you keep using your forearm, the condition might drag on for months.

Use a support wrap during the day but avoid tight bands that could immobilize the tendons.

Avoid feeling cold, which can impede blood flow to the tissues.

Begin strengthening and stretching exercises once the pain has eased. I recommend using a gyroscope, which you can find at any sporting goods store. This low-impact device lengthens every muscle in the forearm when used for just five minutes, twice a day. For two more simple exercises, see “Quick Exercises for Tendonitis” below.

Finally, nothing damages the liver more than stress. Ten minutes of some form of meditation each day can reduce stress’ negative effects.

Robert Keller, CA, practices acupuncture and Chinese medicine in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

Quick Exercises for Tendonitis
The more often you find time to fit these stretches into your workday, says Corte Madera, California, chiropractor Pali Cooper, the bette...

Author: Robert Keller

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