Oral Contraceptives Sidney OH

Young women who take oral contraceptives, aka the Pill, can reduce their risk of developing osteoporosis later in life, but only if they increase their dietary calcium intake now, new research shows. Previous studies indicate the Pill might interfere with optimal bone mass development in adolescents and young women, making them prone to postmenopausal bone loss and fractures. About 80 percent of American women have taken oral contraceptives during their teens and 20s, key bone-building years.

Myungwoo David Rhee
(937) 498-9633
838 W North Street
Sidney, OH
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Ashok G Buddhadev, MD
(937) 492-8878
915 Michigan St
Sidney, OH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Municipal Med Coll, Gujarat Univ, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Valerie Lynn Schulte, DO
(937) 433-4325
915 Michigan St
Sidney, OH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Ohio Univ, Coll Of Osteo Med, Athens Oh 45701
Graduation Year: 1997
Hospital
Hospital: Southview Hospital & Fam Hlth, Centerville, Oh
Group Practice: Contemporary Obstetrics & Gyn

Data Provided by:
Choon Gill Hoang, MD
(937) 778-8831
821 Nicklin Ave
Piqua, OH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Chonnam Univ Med Sch, Kwangju, So Korea
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
Peter William Lachiewicz, DO
(937) 773-0428
280 Looney Rd
Piqua, OH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Des Moines Univ, Coll Osteo Med & Surg, Des Moines Ia 50312
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Ashok G Buddhadev
(937) 492-8878
915 Michigan St
Sidney, OH
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Valerie L Schulte
(937) 498-5373
915 Michigan St
Sidney, OH
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Larry Joseph Holland, DO
(937) 773-0428
280 Looney Rd Ste 301
Piqua, OH
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Des Moines Univ, Coll Osteo Med & Surg, Des Moines Ia 50312
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Larry Joseph Holland
(937) 615-9601
101 Looney Rd
Piqua, OH
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Choongill Hoang
(937) 778-8830
821 Nicklin Ave
Piqua, OH
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Taking the Pill? Add More Calcium

Provided by: 

Young women who take oral contraceptives, aka the Pill, can reduce their risk of developing osteoporosis later in life, but only if they increase their dietary calcium intake now, new research shows. Previous studies indicate the Pill might interfere with optimal bone mass development in adolescents and young women, making them prone to postmenopausal bone loss and fractures. About 80 percent of American women have taken oral contraceptives during their teens and 20s, key bone-building years.

Purdue University researchers tracked 135 healthy women aged 18 to 30 who consumed less than 800 mg per day of dietary calcium. (Recommended intake is 1,000 mg per day.) They compared contraceptive users (57 of the study’s women) to non-users. Each set of women was divided into three groups: One continued eating low levels of calcium, the second added more low-fat, calcium-rich dairy foods to their diet, and the third ate high levels of dietary calcium.

After a year, contraceptive takers who did not increase their dairy intake lost about 1.4 to 2 percent more bone mass density in their hips and spine than those who ate higher quantities of calcium-rich foods. Women who did not take the Pill maintained normal bone density. While 1 to 2 percent sounds small, even tiny bone-mass changes during youth is significant in the long run. And bone loss is compounded each year a woman takes the Pill.

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...