Oral Contraceptives Piedmont SC

Young women who take oral contraceptives, aka the Pill, can reduce their risk of developing osteoporosis later in life, but only if they increase their dietary calcium intake now, new research shows. Previous studies indicate the Pill might interfere with optimal bone mass development in adolescents and young women, making them prone to postmenopausal bone loss and fractures. About 80 percent of American women have taken oral contraceptives during their teens and 20s, key bone-building years.

Eric H Troutman
(864) 295-4210
2 Memorial Medical Dr
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

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Todd Robert Lantz, MD
(864) 271-9780
213 Mills Ave
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sc Sch Of Med, Columbia Sc 29208
Graduation Year: 1994
Hospital
Hospital: St Francis Health System, Greenville, Sc; Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, Sc
Group Practice: Ob-Gyn Group Of Greenville

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Edward P Heidtman IV, MD
(864) 269-0404
11 Memorial Medical Dr
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med, Gainesville Fl 32610
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Spartanburg Reg Med Ctr, Spartanburg, Sc; Mary Black Memorial Hospital, Spartanburg, Sc; St Francis Health System, Greenville, Sc
Group Practice: Carolina Center-Women'S Health

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Dr.LAUREN SELF
(864) 455-7000
701 Grove Road #4
Greenville, SC
Gender
F
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Dr.KARENNE FRU
701 Grove Rd # 1
Greenville, SC
Gender
F
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Floyd Edwin Ellison Jr, MD
(864) 295-4210
2 Memorial Medical Dr
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1964

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Larry Edwin Puls, MD
(864) 455-5520
900 W Faris Road 3rd Floor CTC
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Gynecological Oncology, Obstetrics And Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Southwestern Med Ctr At Dallas, Med Sch, Dallas Tx 75235
Graduation Year: 1985

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David Howard Wells
(864) 455-7939
701 Grove Rd
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

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Jeffrey Michael Ruggeiri
(864) 455-7939
701 Grove Rd
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

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Floyd E Ellison
(864) 295-4210
2 Memorial Medical Dr
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

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Taking the Pill? Add More Calcium

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Young women who take oral contraceptives, aka the Pill, can reduce their risk of developing osteoporosis later in life, but only if they increase their dietary calcium intake now, new research shows. Previous studies indicate the Pill might interfere with optimal bone mass development in adolescents and young women, making them prone to postmenopausal bone loss and fractures. About 80 percent of American women have taken oral contraceptives during their teens and 20s, key bone-building years.

Purdue University researchers tracked 135 healthy women aged 18 to 30 who consumed less than 800 mg per day of dietary calcium. (Recommended intake is 1,000 mg per day.) They compared contraceptive users (57 of the study’s women) to non-users. Each set of women was divided into three groups: One continued eating low levels of calcium, the second added more low-fat, calcium-rich dairy foods to their diet, and the third ate high levels of dietary calcium.

After a year, contraceptive takers who did not increase their dairy intake lost about 1.4 to 2 percent more bone mass density in their hips and spine than those who ate higher quantities of calcium-rich foods. Women who did not take the Pill maintained normal bone density. While 1 to 2 percent sounds small, even tiny bone-mass changes during youth is significant in the long run. And bone loss is compounded each year a woman takes the Pill.

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