Oral Contraceptives Farmville VA

Young women who take oral contraceptives, aka the Pill, can reduce their risk of developing osteoporosis later in life, but only if they increase their dietary calcium intake now, new research shows. Previous studies indicate the Pill might interfere with optimal bone mass development in adolescents and young women, making them prone to postmenopausal bone loss and fractures. About 80 percent of American women have taken oral contraceptives during their teens and 20s, key bone-building years.

E Marie Hooper, MD
(434) 947-2120
208 South Street
Farmville, VA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Health Center-Women & Families
(434) 392-8177
800 Oak St
Farmville, VA

Data Provided by:
Dr. Farahmand
(703) 858-0055
19420 Golf Vista Plaza
Lansdowne, VA
Business
Women's Healthcare of Lansdowne
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Extended Consult / Second Opinion for Complicated Treatment of GYN Disorders Complementary & Alternative Treatments in Gynecology Female Hormonal Disorders from Puberty to Menopause Primary & Secondary Amenorrhea Impact of Eating Disorders on OB/G
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: All major insurance plans accepted.
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: No

Doctor Information
Residency Training: St. Elizabeth Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, MA

Additional Information
Member Organizations: American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists
Awards: American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists Mass Medical Society Medical Society of Virginia American Association of Gynecology Laparoscopists American Fertility Society 25 Years of Service Award, Brigham & Women's Hospital
Languages Spoken: English,Farsi

Data Provided by:
Susan Dausch, MD
(804) 282-9479
7603 Forest Ave
Richmond, VA
Business
West End Obstetrics & Gynecology PC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Bela Satija
(804) 523-3712
2000 Bremo Rd
Richmond, VA
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Michael Stephen Kiken, MD
(434) 392-6040
800 Oak St
Farmville, VA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pittsburgh Sch Of Med, Pittsburgh Pa 15261
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
Shaukat Jahan MD
(703) 421-4050
21495 Ridgetop Cir
Sterling, VA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Catherine Nichols, MD
(804) 828-9270
401-09 N 11th St
Richmond, VA
Business
VCU Womens Health
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Dr.John Bagley
(804) 527-5866
7601 Forest Ave # 228
Richmond, VA
Gender
M
Speciality
Gynecologist (OBGYN)
General Information
Hospital: Henrico Doctors
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Kondeh Augusta Greaves
(703) 396-5284
8700 Sudley Rd
Manassas, VA
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
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Taking the Pill? Add More Calcium

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Young women who take oral contraceptives, aka the Pill, can reduce their risk of developing osteoporosis later in life, but only if they increase their dietary calcium intake now, new research shows. Previous studies indicate the Pill might interfere with optimal bone mass development in adolescents and young women, making them prone to postmenopausal bone loss and fractures. About 80 percent of American women have taken oral contraceptives during their teens and 20s, key bone-building years.

Purdue University researchers tracked 135 healthy women aged 18 to 30 who consumed less than 800 mg per day of dietary calcium. (Recommended intake is 1,000 mg per day.) They compared contraceptive users (57 of the study’s women) to non-users. Each set of women was divided into three groups: One continued eating low levels of calcium, the second added more low-fat, calcium-rich dairy foods to their diet, and the third ate high levels of dietary calcium.

After a year, contraceptive takers who did not increase their dairy intake lost about 1.4 to 2 percent more bone mass density in their hips and spine than those who ate higher quantities of calcium-rich foods. Women who did not take the Pill maintained normal bone density. While 1 to 2 percent sounds small, even tiny bone-mass changes during youth is significant in the long run. And bone loss is compounded each year a woman takes the Pill.

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