Summer Skin Care Hastings NE

In the effort to block the sun’s ravages, lips often get overlooked. And the fact that so many lipsticks and balms still don’t contain sun protection doesn’t make it any easier. But ultraviolet light can be damaging to lips, which are thin to begin with and lack the ability to produce melanin, the tanning pigment that protects skin.

Kristin's Styling Salon
(402) 462-4422
418 N Minnesota Ave
Hastings, NE

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Connie's Country Classic
(402) 756-6607
9519 S Lincoln Ave
Roseland, NE

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Sephora
(402) 466-2222
68 Gateway Mall
Lincoln, NE
Hours
Monday-Saturday:10am-9pm
Sunday:11am-6pm

South Pointe Family Physicians
(402) 323-8400
6820 S 32nd St
Lincoln, NE
 
Lillie's Chateau & Beauty Sln
(402) 554-0400
1823 N 33RD St
Omaha, NE

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Kutt N Dri Salon
(402) 463-5888
200 W 2nd St
Hastings, NE

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Sephora
(402) 289-3939
17101 Davenport Street Suite #103
Omaha, NE
Hours
Monday-Thursday:10am-9pm
Friday-Saturday:10am-9:30pm
Sunday:12pm-6pm

Sephora
(402) 592-1825
Shadow Lake Towne Center,7751 Towne Center Parkway
Papillion, NE
Hours
Monday-Saturday:10am-9pm
Sunday:11am-6pm

Salon On The Court
(402) 486-4747
4708 Prescott Ave Ste D
Lincoln, NE

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Shear Style
(402) 339-7237
7326 Harrison St
LA Vista, NE

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Summer Survival Kit

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Sun &Fun

Duck and Cover: Sunscreen 101
Summer may be the one time of year when most people are likely to wear sunscreen every day. But even that isn’t enough, unless you’re wearing the right kind. “If it doesn’t say ‘broad spectrum,’ don’t buy it,” says San Francisco dermatologist Kathleen Welsh; natural sunscreens, which contain titanium and zinc oxide, qualify because they ensure both UVA and UVB protection. Happily, you no longer have to get superior sun protection by looking like a lifeguard; today’s versions are more refined than they used to be so they’re absorbed into your skin. (No more white noses!) Other ways to save your skin:

• Don’t depend on moisturizers and makeup that contain SPF. “You’d have to cake it on to get the protection they claim,” says Welsh, “and they tend to rub off more easily than pure sunscreen.”
• Higher is better. “SPF 15 is adequate,” says Welch, “but if you’re sensitive to the sun or worried about aging, then definitely go higher.” She recommends an SPF of 30 or higher for everyday use.
• Protect the skin under your clothes. Hold up your clothing to the sun; if light shines through, you know radiation will, too. So use sunscreen beneath lightweight clothing.
• Don’t forget the hot spots. Carcinomas commonly appear on the tip of the nose, tops of the ears, back of the neck, and V-section of the neck—all places that are easy to skip when applying sunscreen.
• Protect yourself even in the shade. You can still get harmful sun exposure in the shade, particularly if you’re near a pool. Concrete also reflects light.
• Remember to reapply. “Sunscreen protection washes off,” says David Voron, a dermatologist at USC School of Medicine in Los Angeles, though more slowly if it’s waterproof. He recommends rubbing on more sunscreen every two hours, just to be safe.

Lip Check
In the effort to block the sun’s ravages, lips often get overlooked. And the fact that so many lipsticks and balms still don’t contain sun protection doesn’t make it any easier. But ultraviolet light can be damaging to lips, which are thin to begin with and lack the ability to produce melanin, the tanning pigment that protects skin, says Mary Lupo, associate clinical professor of dermatology at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans.

So get in the habit of packing a natural lip balm that also offers sun protection. Some good ones:
• Alba Botanical Lipcare SPF 18
• MD Formulations Lip Balm SPF 20
• Jane Iredale Lip Drink SPF 15.

Shield Your Eyes
Invest in good sunglasses. Without consistent sun protection, your eyes are vulnerable to corneal damage and cataracts. Buy shades labeled with the American Optometric Association Seal of Acceptance, which guarantees nearly 100 percent UV protection. “Over-the-counter sunglasses you get at low-cost retail stores are less likely to give you the protection you’re looking for,” says Timothy Wingert, a professor at University of Missouri St. Louis College of Optometry. Ask...

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