Sleep Apnea Columbus OH

When the British author Anthony Burgess wrote, “Laugh and the world laughs with you; snore and you sleep alone,” he struck a sympathetic chord with fellow snorers. But sawing logs is more than just a social faux pas if you’re one of the 12 million Americans with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Dr.Tim Walter
(614) 317-9990
2441 Old Stringtown Road
Grove City, OH
Gender
M
Speciality
Sleep Disorders
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Helmut Siegfried Schmidt, MD
(614) 766-0773
4975 Bradenton Ave
Dublin, OH
Specialties
Sleep Medicine, Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Toronto, Fac Of Med, Toronto, Ont, Canada
Graduation Year: 1964
Hospital
Hospital: Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Oh
Group Practice: Sleep Medicine Research Inc

Data Provided by:
The Ohio State University Sleep Disorders Center The Ohio State University Medical Center
(614) 257-2500
1492 E. Broad Street
Columbus, OH
Ages Seen
13+

Mid Ohio Sleep Center
(614) 586-0668
2760 Airport Drive
Columbus, OH
Doctors Refferal
Only if required by insurance
Ages Seen
>17 years
Insurance
Insurance: Most all
Medicare: Yes
Medicaid: Yes

Ohio Health Sleep Services Riverside Riverside Methodist Hospital
(614) 566-4283
3545 Olentangy River Road
Columbus, OH
Ages Seen
13+

Helmut Siegfried Schmidt, MD
(614) 766-0773
4975 Bradenton Ave
Dublin, OH
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Toronto, Fac Of Med, Toronto, Ont, Canada
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
The Sleep Disorders Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital Nationwide Children's Hospital
(614) 722-4621
700 Children''s Drive
Columbus, OH
Ages Seen
0-21 years

OhioHealth Sleep Services on Bethel Road
(614) 340-3832
974 Bethel Road
Columbus, OH
Ages Seen
13+

Ohio Health Sleep Services at Upper Arlington
(614) 246-0285
1810 Mackenzie Drive
Columbus, OH
Ages Seen
2+

Ohio Health Sleep Services At Grant
(614) 566-9895
285 East State Street
Columbus, OH
Ages Seen
13+

Data Provided by:

Sleep Apnea

Provided by: 

By Leslie Petrovski

When the British author Anthony Burgess wrote, “Laugh and the world laughs with you; snore and you sleep alone,” he struck a sympathetic chord with fellow snorers. But sawing logs is more than just a social faux pas if you’re one of the 12 million Americans with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
If you suffer from OSA, you may not even be consciously aware of your many—up to 300 per night—“apnea” episodes. During those episodes, OSA sufferers actually stop breathing for a minute or more. Apnea occurs when the soft tissues in the rear of the throat relax and cut off airflow. OSA is linked to heart disease, depression, and high blood pressure, but given the number of effective therapies, the condition is nothing to lose sleep over. Conventional treatment usually begins with the continuous positive airway pressure machine (CPAP), a device that blows air into the nose through a face mask. When used correctly, the CPAP typically reduces apnea episodes, but not everyone can tolerate the noise and the discomfort of sleeping with the machine.

John Dye, ND, chairman of the Department of Mind-Body Medicine at Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine, looks at the problem differently. “We treat the whole person to reduce the symptoms,” Dye explains. Dye looks for root causes, focusing on such areas as diet, inflammation, possible allergies, and cardiovascular profile.

To take a holistic approach to the problem, start by taking a hard look at your lifestyle choices: Stop smoking, limit alcohol consumption, and lose weight if you’re carrying a few too many pounds. And don’t sleep on your back. All of these factors can worsen OSA.
Still not sleeping soundly? Try Dye’s regimen:

• Improve your diet by adding more fiber, eating colorful and nutrient-dense foods, and cutting back on red meat and sugar.

• Take 2 to 3 grams per day of krill oil capsules, a possible cholesterol fighter derived from tiny Antarctic crustaceans.

• Add anti-inflammatory herbs such as turmeric (Curcuma longa) and ginger (Zingiber officinale)—1,500 to 2,000 mg of each daily.

• Try 400 mg of vitamin E once or twice a day, plus 500 mg vitamin C two to three times a day.

• Practice playing the didgeridoo. In a study in the British Medical Journal, researchers discovered that daily practice on this indigenous Australian wind instrument reduces apnea, daytime sleepiness, and sleep disturbance for bed partners.

Author: Leslie Petrovski

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