Immunologist Greer SC

Any transition provokes anxiety, but going back to school, with its brand-new rules and social minefields, can be a bona fide stress fest. That not only affects your child’s behavior—classic signs of stress include irritability, difficulty focusing, and trouble learning—but it also makes her more likely to get sick.

Reid F Johnstone
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Andrea Ellen Lantz, MD
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sc Sch Of Med, Columbia Sc 29208
Graduation Year: 1995
Hospital
Hospital: St Francis Health System, Greenville, Sc; Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, Sc
Group Practice: Cross Creek Asthma & Allergy

Data Provided by:
Charles W Greene
(864) 454-2515
200 Patewood Dr
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Douglas Thomas Johnston
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Andrea B Lantz
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Thomas Lucas Tiller, MD
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided by:
Robert Gray Mahon Jr, MD
(864) 234-7815
10 Enterprise Blvd Ste 201
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Otolaryngology, Allergy
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1962
Hospital
Hospital: St Francis Health System, Greenville, Sc; Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, Sc
Group Practice: Piedmont Ent

Data Provided by:
Rudolph Gordon Johnstone
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Rudolph Gordon Johnstone, MD
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Charles William Greene, MD
(864) 454-2515
2000 Patewood Drive
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sc Sch Of Med, Columbia Sc 29208
Graduation Year: 1994

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Secrets of Healthy Kids

Provided by: 

By Melody Warnick

Turns out it takes more than an apple a day to keep your little ones out of the doctor’s office. Here’s what you need to make this fall their healthiest yet.

POP QUIZ: Besides homework and art projects, what’s your kid likely to bring home during the first few weeks of school? That’s right, a cold. But it’s not just exposure to the germs of hundreds of other children that’ll keep her bed-bound. Creeping stress levels and poor eating habits also are to blame. Of course, apart from putting your kids in a plastic bubble, there’s no surefire way to keep them healthy. That’s why experts recommend that you focus on the tried-and-true, such as managing stress, eating whole foods, and fending off germs. No big surprises there, but for kids, an ounce of prevention matters even more than it does for you. “By the time you’re 20, you’ve been exposed to most illnesses, and your immune system knows how to handle them,” says Kathi Kemper, MD, author of The Holistic Pediatrician (Harper Collins, 2002) and a professor of pediatrics at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “Kids, on the other hand, are more susceptible to getting sick than adults, because a child’s immune system is still inexperienced.” So what’s a parent to do? Help your kids follow these rules for stressing less, eating better, and dealing with the inevitable germs that come their way. Here’s how.

Stress Less
Any transition provokes anxiety, but going back to school, with its brand-new rules and social minefields, can be a bona fide stress fest. That not only affects your child’s behavior—classic signs of stress include irritability, difficulty focusing, and trouble learning—but it also makes her more likely to get sick. “Stress is really hard on the immune system—especially a child’s,” says Lynea Gillen, coauthor of Yoga Calm for Children: Educating Heart, Mind, and Body (Three Pebble Press, 2008). “Think of stress as an attack on your kid’s body. If her body is busy dealing with the stress, it won’t have the bandwidth to manage any foreign bodies that come into it, like illness-causing germs.” Here’s how to help calm children so they stay well, mentally and physically:

Encourage some fun in the sun. You know how great you feel after you hit the gym or take a power walk? A little exercise has the same mood-boosting, stress-busting effects for kids. A study by the American College of Sports Medicine shows that playing sports can even help your child excel academically. Bonus: The more she plays outside, the more much-needed vitamin D she’ll soak up from the sun. “It’s thought that one of the reasons that viral infections are more common in winter months is that we’re spending less time in the sun, so our vitamin D levels go way down, reducing our germ resistance,” says Kemper. In the fall, 15 to 20 minutes outside four times a week should supply enough of this nutrient.

Crank up the tunes. Is your teen’s iPod practically a...

Author: Melody Warnick

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