Seborrheic Dermatitis Treatment Salem VA

Cradle cap is, in effect, the infant form of this condition, and it generally disappears after infancy. Adult seborrheic dermatitis can be a chronic condition. Various reports indicate that eliminating food allergens or supplementing with high doses of B vitamins might help.

Robert Joseph O'Brien Jr, MD
(781) 729-4878
1900 Electric Rd
Salem, VA
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1986

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Allison Kingrey Divers, MD
(540) 772-3421
1802 Braeburn Dr
Salem, VA
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Eastern Va Med Sch Of The Med Coll Of Hampton Roads, Norfolk Va 23501
Graduation Year: 1998

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Alouf, MD, Gregory A Physician - Alouf Aesthetics Medical, Gregory A Alouf, MD, PC
(540) 375-9070
1618 Apperson Dr
Salem, VA
 
Kenneth Ray Warrick, MD
(540) 744-0335
7564 Countrywood Dr
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided by:
Larry Patton
(540) 265-1604
4910 Valley View Blvd Nw
Roanoke, VA
Specialty
Dermatology

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Gary Gross
(540) 772-3421
1802 Braeburn Dr
Salem, VA
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Gary Paul Gross, MD
(540) 772-3421
1802 Braeburn Dr
Salem, VA
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1976

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Lewis-Gale Clinic Clearbrook
(540) 725-3060
5303 Indian Grave Rd Sw, #B
Roanoke, VA
 
Allison K Divers
(540) 345-3556
4320 Brambleton Ave Suite B
Roanoke, VA
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Paul C Timmermann, MD
(540) 981-1439
1215 3rd St SW
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, Va
Group Practice: Dermatology Associates Roanoke

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Seborrheic Dermatitis

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by Dan Lukaczer, ND

Q My son is 17 and has been troubled with a scalp condition since childhood. It looks like cradle cap but never goes away. What can I do?

A What you describe sounds like seborrheic dermatitis. Cradle cap is, in effect, the infant form of this condition, and it generally disappears after infancy. Adult seborrheic dermatitis can be a chronic condition, as your son is finding out. The hallmark is a dry, itchy scalp, typically with flaky “scales.”

Various reports indicate that eliminating food allergens or supplementing with high doses of B vitamins might help. Unfortunately, these reports are quite old and there is little recent research to support or refute their claims. You can try eliminating common food allergens such as wheat and dairy for three weeks and see if the condition improves. If it does, continue to stay away from those foods; if not, you’ve lost nothing. The same is true for the B vitamins. I suggest 250 to 500 mcg of B12, and 1 to 2 mg of biotin and folic acid. Try them and see if they have any effect. They are inexpensive, nontoxic and very important for other areas of health.

More recently, scientists found that infants with cradle cap appear to have an imbalance of essential fatty acids in their blood that returns to normal when their cradle cap resolves. In a preliminary trial, topical applications of borage oil (which contains the omega-6 gamma linoleic acid) twice daily to the affected area resulted in clinical improvement within two weeks. A later test, however, did not completely confirm borage oil’s proposed effect. As a practical measure, topical borage oil seems like an easy option to try.

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