Insomnia Doctor Glenview IL

you have difficulty falling asleep at night and waking up in the morning, try dawn/dusk simulation, a form of sleep therapy that resets your body clock. Your body uses natural signals, including sunlight and darkness, to trigger hormones that make you active in the morning and sleepy at night.

Daniel Richard Wynn, MD
(847) 509-0270
3545 Lake Ave Ste 100
Wilmette, IL
Specialties
Neurology, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Languages
English, Spanish
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 1983
Hospital
Hospital: Highland Park Hosp, Highland Park, Il; Rush North Shore Med Ctr, Skokie, Il; Evanston Hosp, Evanston, Il; St Francis Hosp, Evanston, Il; Thorek Hosp& Med Ctr, Chicago, Il; Grant Hosp, Chicago, Il; Bethany Hosp, Chicago, Il; Holy Cross Hosp, Chica

Data Provided by:
Michael Jay Westmoreland, MD
(806) 354-1954
800 N Westmoreland Rd
Lake Forest, IL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Benjamin Dave Margolis, MD
(708) 383-7899
1 Erie Ct Ste 3000
Oak Park, IL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Rush Med Coll Of Rush Univ, Chicago Il 60612
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: West Suburban Hosp Med Ctr, Oak Park, Il; Kindred Hosp -Chicago Central, Chicago, Il

Data Provided by:
Cynthia Louise Comella, MD
(312) 563-2900
1725 W Harrison St
Chicago, IL
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cincinnati Coll Of Med, Cincinnati Oh 45267
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Robert W Hart, MD
(847) 382-6264
450 W Il Route 22
Barrington, IL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Robert W Hart, MD
(847) 981-3660
810 Biesterfield Rd Ste G2
Elk Grove Village, IL
Specialties
Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Cynthia Louise Comella, MD
(312) 942-4500
River Forest, IL
Specialties
Sleep Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cincinnati Coll Of Med, Cincinnati Oh 45267
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Stephen Sheldon, DO
(773) 880-8230
2300 N Childrens Plz Ste 43
Chicago, IL
Specialties
Pediatrics, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Chicago Coll Of Osteo Med, Midwestern Univ, Chicago Il 60615
Graduation Year: 1975
Hospital
Hospital: Evanston Hosp, Evanston, Il; Childrens Mem Hosp, Chicago, Il
Group Practice: Childrens Memorial Hosp

Data Provided by:
Dennis Hoffman, MD
(847) 360-9800
755 S Milwaukee Ave Ste 186
Libertyville, IL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 1990
Hospital
Hospital: Condell Med Ctr, Libertyville, Il; Victory Mem Hosp, Waukegan, Il
Group Practice: Lake County Ctr-Chest Disease

Data Provided by:
Peter Conrad Freebeck, MD
(630) 789-9785
3245 Grove Ave
Berwyn, IL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1986

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Say Good Night to Insomnia

Provided by: 

By Nina Zolotow

You’ve tried it all—chamomile tea, hot baths, aromatherapy, melatonin—and nothing works. Your insomnia obviously calls for something a little stronger than a glass of warm milk. In fact, you need something that packs a bit more punch, but you don’t want to resort to sleep medications. Good news: Sleep researcher Roger Cole, PhD, from Del Mar, California, recommends two powerful, natural sleep therapies that have helped many insomniacs drift off peacefully to dreamland.

Resetting your body clock
If you have difficulty falling asleep at night and waking up in the morning, try dawn/dusk simulation, a form of sleep therapy that resets your body clock. Your body uses natural signals, including sunlight and darkness, to trigger hormones that make you active in the morning and sleepy at night. Bright light, particularly morning sunlight, provides the strongest signal the body uses to regulate this hormonal cycle, called your circadian rhythm. So if you typically awaken before sunrise or work in artificially lit environments, your circadian rhythm may have gotten out of sync. Using a light box may help you reset it.

Here’s how to do it: Spend the first half hour of each morning in simulated “dawn,” by sitting in front of a light box. You can do this while you eat your breakfast, read the paper, or go about your morning routine. Before bed, spend time in simulated “dusk” by closing the curtains and keeping lights dim. This combination should reset your clock within a few days.

If sleep problems continue, wake up and use your light box a half hour earlier for a few days. Cole says eventually you’ll hit a “magic sleep spot.” Once you do, you should be able to discontinue the therapy. But people who are true night owls may need to keep using both dawn and dusk simulation indefinitely to stay on their new schedules.

Cole recommends a light box that delivers 10,000 lux at a distance of at least 20 inches. A large field of view (at least 18” wide) is a plus, and a box that gives white light with an extra boost of blue or blue-green may be more effective than a plain white box.

Sleep restriction
If you have trouble falling and staying asleep, and spend time tossing and turning, sleep restriction therapy may be the ticket. This therapy is based on the theory that although your body may have learned to get along without sleep, it’s actually possible for you to retrain it.

Start by estimating how much sleep you typically get each night, as opposed to how many hours you stay awake in bed hoping for sleep (say five hours of sleep for seven in bed). Stay in bed only for the amount of time you usually sleep (the five hours), scheduling your bedtime and wake-up time appropriately (say, 1 a.m. to 6 a.m.). Meanwhile, use your bedroom for sleeping only (and for, well, you know). And no fair taking mid-day naps.

If you do wake up during the night, lie awake in bed no more than 15 minutes. Then leave the bedroom, stay warm, and engage in a ...

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