Irritable Bowel Syndrome Hamden CT

Peppermint oil may offer additional relief by relaxing intestinal muscles and soothing spasms. In one double-blind trial, four out of five IBS patients reduced their symptoms with enteric-coated peppermint oil. One to two capsules with each meal should do the trick.

Roland Chin-Lue, MR
103 Promenade Dr
Hamden, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Renuka Umashanker, MD
(203) 281-4463
2200 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Dean Chang
(203) 281-4463
2200 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Dean Chang
(203) 281-4463
2200 Whitney Ave # 360
Hamden, CT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 1990
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.3, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Dr.Frank Troncale
(203) 281-4463
2200 Whitney Ave # 360
Hamden, CT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1962
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Hospital: Milford Hosp, Milford, Ct
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Mark Bradley Taylor, MD
(203) 281-4463
2200 Whitney Ave Ste 360
Hamden, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Dr.RONALD VENDER
(203) 281-4463
2200 Whitney Avenue #280
Hamden, CT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Yale Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1977
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Richard Graham La Camera, MD
(727) 785-7654
200 Leeder Hill Dr Apt 217
Hamden, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med, Gainesville Fl 32610
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Anish Sheth, MD
134 Ardmore St
Hamden, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Tarun Kumar Gupta, MD
(203) 334-7654
75 W Meadow Rd
Hamden, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll, Guru Nanak Dev Univ, Amritsar, Punjab, India
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Rx: Pacify Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Provided by: 

By Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa

In March, the FDA pulled Zelnorm, a popular drug for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and constipation, from the market. The withdrawal came after a Swiss government review of 29 Zelnorm studies revealed that patients who used the drug had a tenfold increase in the chance of heart attack, stroke, or severe heart-related chest pain.
The revelation that Zelnorm’s side effects are far from the “norm” creates even more impetus for a natural solution to IBS. About one million Americans have this intestinal disorder, which causes constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. The symptoms, though notoriously sporadic, provoke a striking amount of discomfort and stress. While doctors don’t know for sure what causes IBS, people with stress, fibromyalgia, and sicca complex (dry eyes and mouth) and women having their periods are more likely to suffer IBS symptoms.

Irritable bowel syndrome has numerous other monikers, such as colitis, mucous colitis, spastic colon, and spastic bowel, but none of these terms accurately describe it—IBS doesn’t involve inflammation and should not be confused with ulcerative colitis. Doctors consider IBS a functional disorder because the colon and intestines, upon examination, show no sign of disease, injury, or bleeding. Nonetheless, as IBS sufferers know, the condition is far from phantom. Still, you don’t have to risk a Zelnorm-induced heart attack to find relief; alternative medicine has a long history of treating the condition. First, identify and remove the IBS food triggers from your diet. Although trouble can erupt at any time, the common triggers include gaseous foods, large meals, chocolate, dairy, alcohol, fatty foods, and caffeine.

Next, give your intestines some help with probiotics—friendly bacteria that aid digestion and reduce the population of pathological bugs by competing with them for space. During a four-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 60 IBS patients, treatment with Lactobacillus plantarum probiotics significantly reduced painful gas—and the benefits continued a year after treatment. Shoot for 3 to 5 billion live organisms daily from live yogurt or probiotic supplements.

Peppermint oil may offer additional relief by relaxing intestinal muscles and soothing spasms. In one double-blind trial, four out of five IBS patients reduced their symptoms with enteric-coated peppermint oil. One to two capsules with each meal should do the trick.

Psyllium seed, another heavy hitter against IBS, mitigates diarrhea and pain. As this bulk fiber travels through the gut, it absorbs excess fluids, normalizing stool texture and calming cramps. One study revealed that 82 percent of people relieved their constipation with psyllium. Take 6 to 7 grams with each meal in capsules, chewable wafers, or drinks for a total of about 20 grams daily.

Author: Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa

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