Heartburn Treatments Newberg OR

Poor digestion results in damp heat accumulation in the stomach, leading to acid regurgitation. Foods such as mung bean, tofu, soybeans, wheat, dairy, aloe, banana, cucumber, lettuce, olives, seaweed, summer squash, tomato, and melons, can help cool the stomach and heal energetic imbalances. Foods to help prevent food retention include orange peel, fennel, potato, rhubarb (in moderation), bamboo shoot, pineapple, lemon, barley, hawthorn berry, and malt. Liver qi is responsible for the smooth flow of energy throughout the entire body.

George L Monto, MD
(913) 478-4386
1201 Fulton St Apt 1
Newberg, OR
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Ch
Graduation Year: 1961

Data Provided by:
Patrick Roswell Maveety, MD
(503) 554-1111
701 E 3rd St
Newberg, OR
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Brent K Evetts, MD
(503) 691-1743
19875 SW 65th Ave
Tualatin, OR
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Brian Applebaum
(503) 692-3750
19250 Sw 90th Ave
Tualatin, OR
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
David Gordon Van Sickle, MD
(503) 691-2888
6475 SW Borland Rd Ste G
Tualatin, OR
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci, Washington Dc 20037
Graduation Year: 1966
Hospital
Hospital: Legacy Meridian Park Hospital, Tualatin, Or; Providence St Vincent Med Ctr, Portland, Or

Data Provided by:
Patrick Roswell Maveety
(503) 554-1111
701 E. College St.
Newberg, OR
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Mark Stephen Schiele, MD
(503) 692-3750
19250 SW 90th Ave
Tualatin, OR
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Davis, Sch Of Med, Davis Ca 95616
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Ronald Jay Lew, MD
(503) 692-3750
19250 SW 90th Ave
Tualatin, OR
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided by:
Jeffrey Matthew Douglas
(503) 692-3750
19250 Nw 90th Ave
Tualatin, OR
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Roger Jay Epstein, MD
(508) 754-1956
693 Glatt Cir Ste 4
Woodburn, OR
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Pa State Univ Coll Of Med, Hershey Pa 17033
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
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Relieving Heartburn

Provided by: 

By Juliette Aiyana, LAc

I may be developing acid reflux disease. Every few months, I experience heartburn but refuse to pop antacids or those OTC acid blockers. Can I prevent acid reflux and treat my bouts of heartburn naturally?

The symptoms of acid reflux can cause discomfort and embarrassment. And if left untreated, acid reflux can damage the esophagus. In Chinese medicine we classify acid reflux as a heat disorder commonly affecting the stomach and/or liver energy systems. Heat and fire flare upward bringing the acid into the throat. Acupuncture, dietary changes, and Chinese herbs can quickly relieve your symptoms. To find relief, consult a TCM herbalist who will devise an herbal formula for you based on your unique signs and symptoms. You should not have to take herbs long term if you eat an energetically balanced diet. The Chinese herbal formula Chai Hu Shu Gan Tang (“bupleurum powder to spread the liver”) alleviates symptoms in many people within about one to two weeks, but it should not be taken for an extended period of time.

Poor digestion results in damp heat accumulation in the stomach, leading to acid regurgitation. Foods such as mung bean, tofu, soybeans, wheat, dairy, aloe, banana, cucumber, lettuce, olives, seaweed, summer squash, tomato, and melons, can help cool the stomach and heal energetic imbalances. Foods to help prevent food retention include orange peel, fennel, potato, rhubarb (in moderation), bamboo shoot, pineapple, lemon, barley, hawthorn berry, and malt.

Liver qi is responsible for the smooth flow of energy throughout the entire body. Excessive heat will cause it to move upward and invade the stomach, creating heat there. Try eating dark leafy greens, bitter greens, leeks, quinoa, anise, ginger, basil, turkey, and ocean fish, which help cool and circulate the flow of liver qi.

In all cases, avoid spicy, greasy, fried and oily foods, processed foods, high-fat meats, sugar, and more than two servings of caffeine a day. Reduce your stress and anger, and don’t eat if you are angry or upset. Avoid overeating and drink alcohol in moderation—alcohol generates the heat that leads to acid reflux. I recommend that my heartburn patients abstain from alcohol completely for two to three months and, afterwards, imbibe fewer than four drinks a week.

Juliette Aiyana, LAc, has been a natural health practitioner since 1992. In 2001, she founded Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in New York City (www.amazinghealing.com) .

Author: Juliette Aiyana, LAc

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