Heartburn Treatments Moncks Corner SC

Poor digestion results in damp heat accumulation in the stomach, leading to acid regurgitation. Foods such as mung bean, tofu, soybeans, wheat, dairy, aloe, banana, cucumber, lettuce, olives, seaweed, summer squash, tomato, and melons, can help cool the stomach and heal energetic imbalances. Foods to help prevent food retention include orange peel, fennel, potato, rhubarb (in moderation), bamboo shoot, pineapple, lemon, barley, hawthorn berry, and malt. Liver qi is responsible for the smooth flow of energy throughout the entire body.

Charles Allen Bickerstaff Jr, MD
(843) 761-8795
219 N Highway 52 Ste E
Moncks Corner, SC
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ga Sch Of Med, Augusta Ga 30912
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Albert Jurdan Mossburg, MD
(864) 573-7511
Suite 620 853 N Church Street
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Gary Michael Curtis
(843) 797-1032
9225 C University Blvd
N Charleston, SC
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Salvatore Anthony Moscatello
(843) 797-6800
2671 Elms Plantation Blvd
North Charleston, SC
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Douglas Brown Mc Gill, MD
(507) 284-2511
900 Island Park Dr
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1955

Data Provided by:
Jorge Lazaro Galan, DO
(803) 407-6778
190 Park Ridge Drive Suite 102
Goose Creek, SC
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-Sch Of Osteo Med, Stratford Nj 08084
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Todd Louis Snyder
(843) 797-6800
2671 Elms Plantation Blvd
North Charleston, SC
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Dr.Judd Adelman
(843) 797-6800
2671 Elms Plantation Boulevard
Charleston, SC
Gender
M
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.3, out of 5 based on 5, reviews.

Data Provided by:
David Florez, MR
(843) 797-6800
2671 Elms Plantation Blvd
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Gary Michael Curtis, MD
(843) 797-1032
9225 University Blvd Ste C
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Relieving Heartburn

Provided by: 

By Juliette Aiyana, LAc

I may be developing acid reflux disease. Every few months, I experience heartburn but refuse to pop antacids or those OTC acid blockers. Can I prevent acid reflux and treat my bouts of heartburn naturally?

The symptoms of acid reflux can cause discomfort and embarrassment. And if left untreated, acid reflux can damage the esophagus. In Chinese medicine we classify acid reflux as a heat disorder commonly affecting the stomach and/or liver energy systems. Heat and fire flare upward bringing the acid into the throat. Acupuncture, dietary changes, and Chinese herbs can quickly relieve your symptoms. To find relief, consult a TCM herbalist who will devise an herbal formula for you based on your unique signs and symptoms. You should not have to take herbs long term if you eat an energetically balanced diet. The Chinese herbal formula Chai Hu Shu Gan Tang (“bupleurum powder to spread the liver”) alleviates symptoms in many people within about one to two weeks, but it should not be taken for an extended period of time.

Poor digestion results in damp heat accumulation in the stomach, leading to acid regurgitation. Foods such as mung bean, tofu, soybeans, wheat, dairy, aloe, banana, cucumber, lettuce, olives, seaweed, summer squash, tomato, and melons, can help cool the stomach and heal energetic imbalances. Foods to help prevent food retention include orange peel, fennel, potato, rhubarb (in moderation), bamboo shoot, pineapple, lemon, barley, hawthorn berry, and malt.

Liver qi is responsible for the smooth flow of energy throughout the entire body. Excessive heat will cause it to move upward and invade the stomach, creating heat there. Try eating dark leafy greens, bitter greens, leeks, quinoa, anise, ginger, basil, turkey, and ocean fish, which help cool and circulate the flow of liver qi.

In all cases, avoid spicy, greasy, fried and oily foods, processed foods, high-fat meats, sugar, and more than two servings of caffeine a day. Reduce your stress and anger, and don’t eat if you are angry or upset. Avoid overeating and drink alcohol in moderation—alcohol generates the heat that leads to acid reflux. I recommend that my heartburn patients abstain from alcohol completely for two to three months and, afterwards, imbibe fewer than four drinks a week.

Juliette Aiyana, LAc, has been a natural health practitioner since 1992. In 2001, she founded Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in New York City (www.amazinghealing.com) .

Author: Juliette Aiyana, LAc

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