Heartburn Treatments Lanham MD

Poor digestion results in damp heat accumulation in the stomach, leading to acid regurgitation. Foods such as mung bean, tofu, soybeans, wheat, dairy, aloe, banana, cucumber, lettuce, olives, seaweed, summer squash, tomato, and melons, can help cool the stomach and heal energetic imbalances. Foods to help prevent food retention include orange peel, fennel, potato, rhubarb (in moderation), bamboo shoot, pineapple, lemon, barley, hawthorn berry, and malt. Liver qi is responsible for the smooth flow of energy throughout the entire body.

Douglas D Dykman, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Gastroscopy--colonoscopy--ERCP--Nutrional Counseling--Gut Cam/Capsule Endoscopy--Esophogeal pH monitoring--motility studies--clinical research studies
Doctor Information
Residency Training: The Jewish Hospital of St Louis/ Washington University
Medical School: Washington University,

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Suzanne Sankey, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Gastroscopy--colonoscopy--ERCP--Nutrional Counseling--Gut Cam/Capsule Endoscopy--Esophogeal pH monitoring--motility studies--clinical research studies
Doctor Information
Residency Training: Medical College of Pennsylvania
Medical School: Medical College of Pennsylvania,

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Elizabeth S Gantt, MD
(301) 251-9555
15001 Shady Grove Rd
Rockville, MD
Business
Drs Stern & Gantt
Specialties
Gastroenterology

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James Blake, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Assoc.
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: AAMC
Residency Training: VA Hospital and George Washington University in Wash. DC
Medical School: Medical University of South Carolina,

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Michael N. Peters, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: AAMC
Medical School: Baylor College of Medicine,

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Melanie Jackson, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Gastroscopy--colonoscopy--ERCP--Nutrional Counseling--Gut Cam/Capsule Endoscopy--Esophogeal pH monitoring--motility studies--clinical research studies
Doctor Information
Residency Training: New York Presbyterian Medical Center
Medical School: Howard University,

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William Cassidy, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Assoc.
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: AAMC
Residency Training: Georgetown Service at DC General
Medical School: Loyola Stritch School of Medicine,

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Anthony Calabrese, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Gastroscopy--colonoscopy--ERCP--Nutrional Counseling--Gut Cam/Capsule Endoscopy--Esophogeal pH monitoring--motility studies--clinical research studies
Doctor Information
Medical School: Jefferson Medical College,

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John L. Newman, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Gastroscopy--colonoscopy--ERCP--Nutrional Counseling--Gut Cam/Capsule Endoscopy--Esophogeal pH monitoring--motility studies--clinical research studies
Doctor Information
Residency Training: West Virginia University
Medical School: University of Maryland,

Data Provided by:
Charles Cattano, MD
(410) 224-2116
820 Bestgate Rd
Annapolis, MD
Business
Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Gastroscopy--colonoscopy--ERCP--Nutrional Counseling--Gut Cam/Capsule Endoscopy--Esophogeal pH monitoring--motility studies--clinical research studies---------Pediatric Gastroenterology
Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: AAMC
Residency Training: Northewestern University
Medical School: Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse,

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Relieving Heartburn

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By Juliette Aiyana, LAc

I may be developing acid reflux disease. Every few months, I experience heartburn but refuse to pop antacids or those OTC acid blockers. Can I prevent acid reflux and treat my bouts of heartburn naturally?

The symptoms of acid reflux can cause discomfort and embarrassment. And if left untreated, acid reflux can damage the esophagus. In Chinese medicine we classify acid reflux as a heat disorder commonly affecting the stomach and/or liver energy systems. Heat and fire flare upward bringing the acid into the throat. Acupuncture, dietary changes, and Chinese herbs can quickly relieve your symptoms. To find relief, consult a TCM herbalist who will devise an herbal formula for you based on your unique signs and symptoms. You should not have to take herbs long term if you eat an energetically balanced diet. The Chinese herbal formula Chai Hu Shu Gan Tang (“bupleurum powder to spread the liver”) alleviates symptoms in many people within about one to two weeks, but it should not be taken for an extended period of time.

Poor digestion results in damp heat accumulation in the stomach, leading to acid regurgitation. Foods such as mung bean, tofu, soybeans, wheat, dairy, aloe, banana, cucumber, lettuce, olives, seaweed, summer squash, tomato, and melons, can help cool the stomach and heal energetic imbalances. Foods to help prevent food retention include orange peel, fennel, potato, rhubarb (in moderation), bamboo shoot, pineapple, lemon, barley, hawthorn berry, and malt.

Liver qi is responsible for the smooth flow of energy throughout the entire body. Excessive heat will cause it to move upward and invade the stomach, creating heat there. Try eating dark leafy greens, bitter greens, leeks, quinoa, anise, ginger, basil, turkey, and ocean fish, which help cool and circulate the flow of liver qi.

In all cases, avoid spicy, greasy, fried and oily foods, processed foods, high-fat meats, sugar, and more than two servings of caffeine a day. Reduce your stress and anger, and don’t eat if you are angry or upset. Avoid overeating and drink alcohol in moderation—alcohol generates the heat that leads to acid reflux. I recommend that my heartburn patients abstain from alcohol completely for two to three months and, afterwards, imbibe fewer than four drinks a week.

Juliette Aiyana, LAc, has been a natural health practitioner since 1992. In 2001, she founded Aiyana Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs in New York City (www.amazinghealing.com) .

Author: Juliette Aiyana, LAc

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions

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