Heat Baths Oxford OH

Moist or dry, both types of heat provide many of the same benefits. The skin enjoys increased blood flow (and a healthy glow), your pores get cleared of all the grime that’s settled in, and the sweating provides a deep level of detoxification. Spending time in the sauna or steam room reduces stress; relieves the pain of sore muscles, arthritis, and fibromyalgia; and allows you to completely relax.

Mid-America Glass Block
(513) 742-5900
490 Northland Blvd
Cincinnati, OH
 
Kleine & Sons Inc.
(513) 761-3410
850 Redna Terrace
Cincinnati, OH

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Reliance Remodeling
(614) 264-0621
1608 Lafayette Dr
Columbus, OH
 
The Jae Company
(614) 324-5231
6295 Maxtown Road
Westerville, OH
 
Kresge Contracting
(614) 794-9222
5841 Emporium Square
Columbus, OH
 
Classic Kitchen Design
(513) 741-0555
5704 Cheviot Rd
Cincinnati, OH
 
Alex
(440) 542-0209
P.O. Box 39382
Solon, OH
 
Mark I Custom Cabinetry
(513) 761-5488
326 West Wyoming Avenue
Lockland, OH

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The Jae Company
(614) 294-4941
1745 W. Lane Ave.
Columbus, OH
 
Ellis Kitchens & Baths
(614) 461-1218
477 South Front Street
Columbus, OH
 
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Rejuvenating Heat Baths

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By Linda Martin

In heated little rooms, Finns gave birth, American Indians experienced spiritual cleansing, and the Romans scrubbed their bodies after a tough day building the empire. We know them as saunas and steam baths, Middle Easterners call them hammam, and the Russians love their banya—all hot boxes that serve to ease stiff muscles, soothe away arthritic pains, lift the spirit, relax the mind, and cleanse the body. In India, ayurvedic physicians use heat in their panchakarma practices to prepare the body for cleansing by dilating the channels of circulation and enabling the toxins to leave the body more readily. Simple fact: Sweating is good for you.

Choose your method
Within minutes of stepping into a sauna, you begin to sweat, but because of the dry air—heated to up to 200 degrees—your perspiration evaporates almost instantly. To keep the heat up in a sauna, you must splash the rocks with water periodically, which creates a burst of steam—boosting air temperature.

In a steam room, on the other hand, your skin drips with perspiration—like it does on a humid Midwestern summer’s day—and the air gets so steamy you can only catch glimpses of the tile-walled room that encloses the moist heat. Less intense than a sauna, the heat in a steam room hovers around 110 to 116 degrees. You needn’t do anything to regulate the heat, which comes from steam generators, housed outside the room.

What are they good for?

Moist or dry, both types of heat provide many of the same benefits. The skin enjoys increased blood flow (and a healthy glow), your pores get cleared of all the grime that’s settled in, and the sweating provides a deep level of detoxification. Spending time in the sauna or steam room reduces stress; relieves the pain of sore muscles, arthritis, and fibromyalgia; and allows you to completely relax.

It works like this: The heart pumps faster, blood vessels dilate, the skin turns red, and sweat surges. Pores open and the body drips in an attempt to cool down. Some experts claim that the skin acts as a “third kidney” and excretes, along with perspiration, small amounts of toxins such as mercury, copper, lead, and zinc. John Longhurst, MD, director of the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of California, Irvine, recommends steam baths in particular for respiratory ailments like asthma, colds, and sinus congestion. A bonus for women: The heat often relieves menstrual cramps.

How to do it right
In order to reap the benefits, pay attention to these caveats:
• Don’t stay too long in a steam bath or sauna—about 20 minutes is plenty; otherwise you’ll lose too much fluid. Drink plenty of water—before, during, and after—to prevent dehydration.
• “Maintain self-referral and listen to the needs of your body,” advises David Simon, MD, cofounder and medical director of the Chopra Center for Well Being. “Steam therapy is not a competitive activity.”
• Mix it up. Some hearty bathers alternate heat with cold, takin...

Author: Linda Martin

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