Kidney Stones Prevention Pierre SD

The old rumor that it’s important to keep calcium low in the diet has been proven incorrect. In fact, just the opposite is true: research shows that increasing dietary calcium can decrease the incidence of calcium oxalate stones in recurrent stone formers, in part, at least, by binding oxalates from food.

David Hugh Kovaleski, MD
(804) 828-9682
6104 W Queens Cir
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided by:
Shahid Sattar Chaudhary
(605) 622-2895
3015 6th Ave Se
Aberdeen, SD
Specialty
Nephrology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Alex Kessler
(605) 328-8100
1310 West 22nd Street
Sioux Falls, SD
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Nova Se Univ, Coll Of Osteo Med
Year of Graduation: 1997
Speciality
Nephrologist
General Information
Hospital: Sanford
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Dr.Robert Santella
(605) 322-5800
1001 E 21st St # 300
Sioux Falls, SD
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1983
Speciality
Nephrologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.8, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Louis Charles Raymond, MD
(605) 341-3140
4929 Carriage Hills Dr
Rapid City, SD
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Hahnemann Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19102
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Kelly A Burdge
(605) 322-5800
1001 E. 21st St., Ste. 300
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialty
Nephrology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Mazen Nemeh
(605) 322-5800
1001 E 21st St # 300
Sioux Falls, SD
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Damascus, Fac Of Med, Damascus
Year of Graduation: 1985
Speciality
Nephrologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Min-Hwa Chow, MD
(712) 255-7746
938 Pebble Beach Dr
Dakota Dunes, SD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ross Univ, Sch Of Med & Vet Med, Roseau, Dominica
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Richard A Jensen
(605) 334-6500
2333 W 57th St Ste 101
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialty
Nephrology

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Fredric M Birch
(605) 719-6980
640 Flormann St
Rapid City, SD
Specialty
Nephrology

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Reducing the Risk of Kidney Stones

Provided by: 

By Dan Lukaczer, ND

Q I’ve had kidney stones a couple of times in the past few years. My doctor says they come from calcium oxalate and that I should drink more water. Is there anything else I should consider?

A If you’ve had any type of kidney stone more than once, I would put you in the category of a recurrent kidney- stone former. Thus, your chances of having a repeat episode are high. You’re not alone. More than 500,000 Americans per year suffer from kidney stones. For a man, the chance of developing a stone is one in 10 over the course of his life. For a woman, the chance is somewhat less.

You mention your kidney stones are the calcium-oxalate variety—the most common stone by far (other types are struvite, uric acid and cystine). Studies show the creation of these stones is related to diet, particularly to eating oxalates. There are a number of foods that contain natural oxalates, with the highest amounts found in spinach. Rhubarb, beets, nuts, chocolate, tea, wheat bran and strawberries also have oxalates, and all should be limited in the diet when this type of kidney stone is a problem.

Additionally, it is important to increase the solubility of oxalates in the urine so they don’t crystallize and form stones. As your doctor suggested, you should make a habit of drinking plenty of water each day so you stay well hydrated. A rule of thumb is to drink at least eight glasses per day. There are also specific nutrients that appear to help, with magnesium, potassium and B6 leading the list. A recent study that analyzed chronic stone formers who took approximately 500 mg of magnesium oxide and 5 g of potassium-sodium citrate for one week found that oxalate crystals in the urine—a warning sign of potential stone formation—decreased by two thirds.

Lastly, the old rumor that it’s important to keep calcium low in the diet has been proven incorrect. In fact, just the opposite is true: research shows that increasing dietary calcium can decrease the incidence of calcium oxalate stones in recurrent stone formers, in part, at least, by binding oxalates from food.

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