Boswellia Information Sand Springs OK

Boswellia (Boswellia serrata), also known as Indian frankincense, belongs to a family of resinous trees renowned for their oil. This particular species grows only in the dry hills of western and central India. According to the earliest Ayurvedic texts, boswellia was traditionally used to treat respiratory ailments, digestive disorders, and joint diseases. Recent clinical studies have confirmed many of the traditional uses for boswellia as well as indicated its efficacy for treating asthma, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Gerard Kevin Donovan, MD
(918) 838-4823
Sand Springs, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: Hillcrest Health Ctr, Oklahoma City, Ok; St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok; St Francis Hospital, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Ou Pediatric Dept

Data Provided by:
William Kent Briggs, MD
(918) 451-5222
5301 Oak Lake Ln
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1990
Hospital
Hospital: Southcrest Hospital, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Gastroenterology Spec Inc

Data Provided by:
Seth Nunnally Wheeler, MD
(918) 582-6544
2272 E 34th St
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Richard Weber Seifert, MD
(918) 584-0123
1145 S Utica Ave Ste 909
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1976
Hospital
Hospital: Hillcrest Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok

Data Provided by:
Dr.Barry Eisen
(918) 749-3939
1725 E 19th St # 600
Tulsa, OK
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1980
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Hospital: St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.8, out of 5 based on 6, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Nnaemeka Obumneme Udezue, MD
Tulsa, OK
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ibadan, Coll Of Med, Ibadan, Oyo, Nigeria
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
Norman Morris Simon, MD
(918) 749-3939
3519 S Florence Ave
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 1969
Hospital
Hospital: St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Tulsa Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Markham Lee Nightengale, MD
(918) 481-4700
2510 E 34th St
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Haresh Kantilal Ajmera, MD
(918) 744-8115
2325 S Harvard Ave
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Seth G S Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
Dr.Harvey Tatum
(918) 582-6544
1145 S Utica Ave # 701
Tulsa, OK
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1980
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Hospital: Hillcrest Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Reduce Inflammation With Boswellia

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Boswellia (Boswellia serrata), also known as Indian frankincense, belongs to a family of resinous trees renowned for their oil. This particular species grows only in the dry hills of western and central India. According to the earliest Ayurvedic texts, boswellia was traditionally used to treat respiratory ailments, digestive disorders, and joint diseases. Recent clinical studies have confirmed many of the traditional uses for boswellia as well as indicated its efficacy for treating asthma, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

The boswellia tree, which often reaches up to 18 feet in height, has a thick, papery bark that yields a gummy substance when peeled away. This gum contains natural sugars, essential oils, and a compound of terpenoids that is believed to account for boswellia’s medicinal properties. The acids in this compound have been named boswellic acids, and their potent inflammatory actions inhibit the production of prostaglandins, fatty acids that have hormone-like effects.

One of the strongest studies done on boswellia compared the use of boswellia with the standard drug treatment for ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disorder. The study found that 82 percent of the patients taking the herb went into complete remission, compared with 75 percent on the medication. Although more scientific research is needed, it is encouraging that this safe and inexpensive herb has such potential benefits. And unlike most anti-inflammatory drugs, boswellia does not irritate the stomach.

The variety of health concerns that boswellia addresses is truly impressive. It also helps mobilize phlegm in respiratory conditions, normalizes menstrual irregularities, treats liver ailments, and enhances metabolic activity to aid in weight loss. As a paste, it can be applied to acne. As a poultice applied to joints, it can reduce the pain of injury. The underlying theme to all of boswellia’s applications is its ability to successfully treat conditions of excessive inflammation.

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