RX-Hypertension Potsdam NY

To control high blood pressure, doctors usually recommend lifestyle changes—exercise, relaxation, and cutting back on salt—plus medication. Soon, daily hibiscus tea may join that line up.

Alexandru Stoian, MD
(315) 265-3072
842 Bagdad Rd
Potsdam, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Inst De Med Si Farm, Carol Davila, Bucharest, Romania
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
George Landa
(845) 354-3010
8 Medical Park Dr
Pomona, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Harold Klestzick
(718) 239-5877
3594 E Tremont Ave # 300
Bronx, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Jerome Dubroff
(718) 946-7557
130 Brighton Beach Ave
Brooklyn, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Jairaj Chaudhry
(845) 294-1234
2004 Route 17M
Goshen, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Nidal Makhoul, MD
(315) 764-1025
27 Hospital Dr
Massena, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Damascus, Fac Of Med, Damascus, Syria
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Daniel Bloomfield
(212) 305-4725
622 West 168th Street
New York, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Leslie Cooperman
(516) 390-2420
1010 Northern Blvd
Great Neck, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Sinan Kadayifci
(212) 434-2468
100 E 77th St
New York, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Walter Liebling
(212) 362-8658
305 W. 87th St.
New York, NY
Specialties
Cardiology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

RX-Hypertension

Provided by: 

By Jennifer Pirtle

According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Association, nearly one-third of Americans suffer from hypertension (high blood pressure). Like thin-walled hoses holding too much water pressure, the blood vessels of hyper- tensives become stretched and fragile. The intense pressure can also endanger the other organs and lead to heart and kidney failure, strokes, or blindness.

To control high blood pressure, doctors usually recommend lifestyle changes—exercise, relaxation, and cutting back on salt—plus medication. Soon, daily hibiscus tea may join that line up. It appears to ease mild hypertension the same way many anti-hypertensive drugs do—by opening the blood vessels, decreasing the viscosity of the blood, and increasing urine production (which reduces blood volume).

Hibiscus teas are made from the flowering bush Hibiscus sabdariffa, a relative of the yard-dwelling tropical beauty with the dinner plate-sized flowers. Sometimes called roselle or karkade, the plant grows a thick, juicy calyx (the ring around the base of the blossom) that people the world over use for flavorings, drinks, desserts, and now, hypertension treatment. In a study published in Phytomedicine in 2004, patients drank a daily infusion of 10 grams of the dried calyxes. Study results show the tea controlled mild to moderate hypertension as effectively as captopril, a leading drug for hypertension and heart failure.

It also works quickly. The Journal of Ethnopharmacology reported that after just 12 days, 31 patients drinking hibiscus tea averaged an 11.2 percent drop in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and a 10.7 percent drop in diastolic blood pressure (DSP). (Your heart generates SBP during a beat and DSP between beats.) In hypertensive individuals, SBP tops 140 and DSP 90. Normal blood pressure measures below 120 SBP and 80 DSP, which means hibiscus tea could bring a mild case of hypertension down to near normal in less than two weeks.

How should hypertensives use this wonder beverage? If you currently take blood-pressure medication, Ellen Kamhi, PhD, RN, and coauthor of The Natural Medicine Chest (Evans & Co., 2000), recommends working with an herb-savvy medical professional using conventional diagnostic techniques to make sure your blood pressure stays within acceptable levels as you slowly cut back on one pharmaceutical drug at a time. “Herbs’ benefit-to-risk ratio is much better than pharmaceutical drugs’,” she adds, “so it’s worth your time
to experiment.”

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