Non-Pathogenic Supplements Scottsdale AZ

Probiotic, prebiotic; good bugs, bad bugs. Every time we turn around, another study champions the benefits of these gut-friendly supplements. But what are they? What do they do? Why should we take them?

Jodine L. Wamlsey
(480) 419-8267
7500 E. Pinnacle Peak Road
Scottsdale, AZ
Business
Body Solutions
Specialties
Acupuncture, Nutrition
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Medical School: Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, San Diego, CA, 2002
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Acupuncture Association
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided by:
Healthsmart
(480) 551-7246
8989 E Via Linda
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist, Health Spa, Massage Practitioner

Data Provided by:
Health's Essence Natural Therapeutics, LLC
(480) 657-2633
9817 N 95TH ST STE 110
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist

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Market Watch
(480) 473-2000
9170 E Bahia Dr
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist, Personal Trainer

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Monavie of Scottsdale - Acai Berry Antioxidant Health Drink
(480) 272-3045
9803 E Voltaire Dr
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist

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Nutritionist Melody Oaks
(623) 572-0495
8505 E SAN BERNARDO DR
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist

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Integrative Nutrition Consultants, LLC
(480) 659-0748
10055 E Mountain View Lake Dr
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist

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Nutrition Studio
(602) 569-3509
10304 N Hayden Rd
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Nutritionist, Massage Practitioner, Personal Trainer, Physical Therapist

Data Provided by:
AZ Center for Advanced Medicine
(480) 240-2600
9328 East Raintree Drive
Scottsdale, AZ
Services
Acupuncture, Yeast Syndrome, Women's Health, Stress Management, Preventive Medicine, Nutrition, Metabolic Medicine, Hypnosis/Hypnotherapy, Family Practice, Environmental Medicine, Diabetes, Chelation Therapy, Cardiovascular Disease, Arthritis, Allergy, Acupuncture
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Harkins Wellness Center
(480) 991-7558
7507 E Mcdonald Dr
Scottsdale, AZ
Industry
Acupuncturist, Nutritionist

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Primer on Probiotics

Provided by: 

By Nora Simmons

Probiotic, prebiotic; good bugs, bad bugs. Every time we turn around, another study champions the benefits of these gut-friendly supplements. But what are they? What do they do? Why should we take them? We asked Angelica S. Vrablic, PhD, a leading expert in nutrition research and a probiotic guru, to give us the lowdown. Here’s what we learned:

1. Probiotics are non-pathogenic (not capable of causing harm) bacteria that naturally live in our gut.
2. Probiotics help keep our intestines healthy and our digestive and urinary tracts running smoothly. These immunity boosters keep infection-causing bacteria (think salmonella and ulcer-inducing H. pylori) from thriving in our intestinal tracts by crowding them out and producing proteins that kill them.
3. The body doesn’t make probiotics on its own; we have to supply them, either by eating fermented food or taking supplements. Back in the good ol’ days, when Grandma pickled her garden-grown cucumbers, fermented the cabbage patch into sauerkraut, and cultured her own yogurt, our diets supplied all the healthy flora we needed. But now almost all fermented foods (even those found in natural grocery stores) contain added sugars and have undergone pasteurization, which kills the good bacteria along with the bad. “If you can find unpasteurized fermented foods (kimchi, pickles, and sauerkraut), buy pasteurized yogurt to which the probiotics have been added back, and eat plenty of prebiotics, you don’t need to supplement,” says Vrablic. But if you’re like most of us—and be honest—you need to supplement.
4. And you should. Every day. Especially after you’ve taken antibiotics. “Antibiotics kill bacteria, and because probiotics are bacterial cultures, they can’t survive. Your gut will desperately need to recolonize its healthy flora,” says Vrablic. “But wait until you finish your antibiotics before starting your probiotic supplements.” As long as you’re not on antibiotics currently, you can take probiotics at any time of the day, with or without food. And they’re totally safe; even a first-time probiotic user can confidently take the recommended dose every day.
5. So what is a prebiotic? Simply put, a prebiotic is food—a complex carb (fiber)—for your probiotic bacteria. For example, Lactobacillus acidophilus feed on the lactose from milk; they then produce lactic acid and thus yogurt. Common prebiotics include inulin (carb from chicory), pectin fiber (from citrus fruit), and almonds. Many probiotic supplements will contain a prebiotic formula too.
6. You can find formulas that specifically target different digestive issues: Lactobacillus acidophilus for gassy stomachs and lactose intolerance; bifidobacteria for intestinal problems and deeper digestive issues; or Lactobacillus rhamnosus for general gut and immune support. But Vrablic recommends finding a good all-around daily supplement that includes several strains so that you cover all your bases.
7. When you choose a supplement, rem...

Author: Nora Simmons

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