Postpartum Depression Treatment Sioux Falls SD

You thought you have a postpartum depression? Rather than rushing to treat your symptoms with medication, it would be more appropriate to first do some testing to make sure no underlying nutritional or endocrine problems need correcting.

Mrs. Susanne Nelson
Knapp Counseling and Associates
(605) 373-9330
2121 W. 63rd Place, Suite 100
Sioux Falls, SD
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, ACSW, CSW-PIP
Licensed in South Dakota
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Depression
Populations Served
Disabled, Sensory Impaired (hearing, vision, etc), Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Robert R. Perkinson
(605) 987-2872
Keystone Treatment Ctr
Canton, SD
Services
Substance-Related Disorder (e.g., abuse or dependency involving drug/alcohol), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Individual Psychotherapy
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Utah State University
Credentialed Since: 1976-11-22

Data Provided by:
Dr. Mary E Jones
(605) 609-1594
Integrative Wellness5000 S.Minnesota Avenue
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Depression, Anxiety or Fears, Peer Relationships, Bipolar Disorder
Qualification
School: University of South Dakota
Year of Graduation: 1990
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Average Cost
$130 - $150
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: BlueCross and/or BlueShield

Robert R. Perkinson
(605) 987-2872
Keystone Treatment Ctr
Canton, SD
Services
Substance-Related Disorder (e.g., abuse or dependency involving drug/alcohol), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Individual Psychotherapy
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Utah State University
Credentialed Since: 1976-11-22

Data Provided by:
Carol B. Kuntz
(605) 322-5700
4400 west 69th Street
Sioux Falls, SD
Services
Clinical Neuropsychological Assessment, Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), PostTraumatic Stress Disorder or Acute Trauma Reaction, Couples Psychotherapy
Ages Served
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Central Michigan University
Credentialed Since: 1995-06-02

Data Provided by:
Carol B. Kuntz
(605) 322-5700
4400 west 69th Street
Sioux Falls, SD
Services
Clinical Neuropsychological Assessment, Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), PostTraumatic Stress Disorder or Acute Trauma Reaction, Couples Psychotherapy
Ages Served
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Central Michigan University
Credentialed Since: 1995-06-02

Data Provided by:
Amber Chan
(605) 956-3442 x228
Chan Counseling Services2121 W. 63rd Place
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Depression, Anxiety or Fears, Trauma and PTSD, Impulse Control Disorders
Qualification
School: St. John Fisher College
Year of Graduation: 2006
Years In Practice: 8 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adults
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Mrs. Susanne Nelson
Knapp Counseling and Associates
(605) 373-9330
2121 W. 63rd Place, Suite 100
Sioux Falls, SD
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, ACSW, CSW-PIP
Licensed in South Dakota
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Depression
Populations Served
Disabled, Sensory Impaired (hearing, vision, etc), Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Dawn Williams
Four C's Counseling, LLC
(605) 342-8552
2218 Jackson Blvd. Suite 12
Rapid City, SD
Credentials
Credentials: MS,LSW, LPC
Licensed in South Dakota
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Runaways, Sexual Abuse/Rape, S
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Michelle Hinseth
Sanford Vermillion
(605) 624-2611
20 S. Plum Street
Vermillion, SD
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, CSW-PIP
Licensed in South Dakota
7 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Interpersonal Relationships
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Postpartum Depression

Provided by: 

By Robert Rountree, MD

Q.
Three months ago I gave birth to my first child, a beautiful baby girl. Ever since, I’ve felt extremely tired all the time, plus I frequently get very moody, depressed, and irritable. My ob-gyn wants me to take an antidepressant, but I would rather avoid medication. Suggestions?

A. Rather than rushing to treat your symptoms with medication, it would be more appropriate to first do some testing to make sure no underlying nutritional or endocrine problems need correcting. If you haven’t already done so, you should start with a blood test for anemia. Anemia after childbirth can be caused by deficiencies of iron and/or B vitamins, especially folic acid, B12, and B6. These deficiencies are usually corrected by taking a standard prenatal vitamin-mineral supplement. However, at least 25 percent of women have a genetic condition that increases their need for folic acid. For that reason, I recommend measuring your blood levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that increases when there is a deficiency of folic acid. A test for levels of methylmalonic acid, which increases with vitamin B12 deficiency, may also prove useful. Studies have shown that people with depression tend to have elevated levels of homocysteine along with low levels of folic acid, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6.

I also recommend having your blood sugar tested to make sure you don’t have diabetes or reactive hypoglycemia. You can test your blood sugar at home by using one of the handheld glucometers available at most drug stores. If your blood sugar is bouncing up and down, that can certainly drain your energy and make you feel irritable, even if the levels aren’t high or low enough to qualify as an official disease. The best way to stabilize blood sugar is to eat frequent small meals with lots of fiber and protein.

You should definitely get a complete test for thyroid hormone levels, including anti-thyroid antibodies. Thyroid disorders (both hyper- and hypo-) from autoimmune thyroiditis are very common in the postpartum period, affecting up to 10 percent of new mothers. If these are normal, I would recommend an adrenal hormone analysis, which measures salivary levels of cortisol throughout the day and evening. The cumulative physical and emotional stress of pregnancy and childbirth, followed by the 24-hour job of caring for a helpless infant is enough to strain anyone’s adrenal glands, so it’s not unusual to find problems with cortisol production.

In addition to correcting any abnormalities that might turn up with this testing, I strongly recommend taking a fish oil supplement that is high in DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). Studies have shown that pregnant and postpartum women tend to be depleted of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil, especially DHA. Restoring DHA to normal levels can improve mood and—via breast milk—enhance brain function in the baby. A good target dose is 1,200 to 2,400 mg of DHA and 250 to 500 mg EPA a day.

I find two herbs—eleuthero (E...

Author: Robert Rountree, MD

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