Peripheral Artery Disease Specialist Morristown TN

The initial screening for PAD is quick, inexpensive, and painless. Called the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the test offers a simple and reliable means of diagnosing the condition. The ABI measures the blood pressure of the ankle and arm at the same time using a pencil'shaped ultrasound device called a Doppler.

Sunil Ramaprasad
(423) 586-5567
705 Mcfarland St
Morristown, TN
Specialty
Cardiology

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Orlanda R Lowry III, MD
(423) 581-2795
850 W 3rd North St Ste B
Morristown, TN
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1964

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Steven T Martin, MD
(901) 371-9040
4901 Raleigh Common Dr
Memphis, TN
Business
Cardiovascular Physicians of Memphis
Specialties
Cardiology

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Richard R McBride, MD
(540) 342-7941
900 Oak Hill Avenue East South
Knoxville, TN
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: American Univ Of The Caribbean, Sch Of Med, Plymouth, Montserrat
Graduation Year: 1989

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S Ann Jackson, MD
(423) 979-3497
3321 Berkshire Cir
Johnson City, TN
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1985

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Chaitanya Bhupendra Shah, MD
(423) 586-5567
705 McFarland St
Morristown, TN
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll, Baroda Univ, Baroda, Gujarat, India
Graduation Year: 1989

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Morristown Heart Consultants
(423) 585-5567
705 Mcfarland St
Morristown, TN

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Kermit Rupert Brown, MD
(615) 329-0494
2201 Murphy Ave Ste 220
Nashville, TN
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Meharry Med Coll Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37208
Graduation Year: 1959

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Dr.Byron Haitas
(615) 342-5955
2400 Patterson St. #304
Nashville, TN
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The Witwatersrand, Med Sch, Johannesburg
Year of Graduation: 1977
Speciality
Cardiologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Otto H P Teixeira, MD, FACC
926 W Oakland Ave Ste 206
Johnson City, TN
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Peripheral Artery Disease

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By Vonalda M. Utterback, CN

Chances are you’ve never heard of peripheral arterial disease, often called PAD, an illness characterized by clogged arteries in the legs and other extremities. Here’s why you should know about it: This potentially deadly disease affects 8 million to 12 million Americans, yet as many as 75 percent of them experience no symptoms and haven’t a clue they have the disease.

The most common type of peripheral vascular disease, PAD occurs when extra cholesterol and other fats, called plaque, collect in the walls of arteries. This process, if left unchecked, narrows the arteries and reduces—and eventually can totally block—blood flow. PAD occurs most often in the legs, but may also affect the heart, stomach, arms, and even kidneys.

“Diagnosis is critical,” says Dennis Goodman, MD, FACC, senior cardiologist at Scripps Integrative Medicine Department in La Jolla, California. “PAD is one of the strongest risk markers for heart disease. People with PAD have a six- to seven-times higher risk of heart attack or stroke (and may even face amputation of the affected limb due to gangrene) if the disease progresses without treatment.” If that’s not enough to encourage you to arm yourself with knowledge of this disease, consider this: Severe and symptomatic PAD increases cardiovascular and coronary heart disease mortality a whopping 15-fold, according to a study conducted at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine.

Silent and insidious
PAD develops slowly over years, and symptoms may not appear until the disease has progressed to a very serious stage. “In fact, many people with PAD have no symptoms at all, at least until their leg arteries have narrowed by 60 percent or more,” adds Angila Jaeggli, ND, at the Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Kenmore, Washington.

To add to the confusion, people may mistake the most common symptom of PAD, claudication—a restriction of blood flow to the limbs resulting in fatigue, heaviness, excess tiredness, or cramping in the leg muscles during any type of exercise—as normal fatigue. Or they may chalk it up simply as a sign of aging. Adding further to the confusion, symptoms of claudication come and go, usually appearing only during exertion, which contributes to an “out of pain, out of mind” mentality. Other symptoms of severe PAD include lingering foot pain, slow-healing wounds on the feet or toes, color changes in the skin of the feet, including paleness or blueness, and erectile dysfunction.

Test it out
The initial screening for PAD is quick, inexpensive, and painless. Called the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the test offers a simple and reliable means of diagnosing the condition. The ABI measures the blood pressure of the ankle and arm at the same time using a pencil-shaped ultrasound device called a Doppler. By dividing the highest blood pressure at the ankle by the highest recorded pressure in your arm, your healthcare practitioner arrives at your ABI. Healthy a...

Author: Vonalda M. Utterback

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