Peripheral Artery Disease Specialist Chehalis WA

The initial screening for PAD is quick, inexpensive, and painless. Called the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the test offers a simple and reliable means of diagnosing the condition. The ABI measures the blood pressure of the ankle and arm at the same time using a pencil'shaped ultrasound device called a Doppler.

Helmuth Franz Fritz, MD
1800 Cooks Hill Rd
Centralia, WA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided by:
Barbara Guller, MD
(206) 535-5126
17404 49th Avenue Ct E
Tacoma, WA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Zurich, Med Fak, Zurich, Switzerland
Graduation Year: 1957

Data Provided by:
Marcus A De Wood, MD
(509) 455-4100
PO Box 8267
Spokane, WA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Richard F Grady, MD
(973) 744-0879
1959 NE Pacific St
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1952
Hospital
Hospital: Bellevue Hosp Center, New York, Ny

Data Provided by:
Keiko Aikawa, MD
(206) 363-1004
2222 Eastmont Way W
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Tiong-Keat Yeoh, MD
(206) 215-4545
550 17th Ave
Seattle, WA
Business
Seattle Cardiology
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Noel E SantO'Domingo, MD
(360) 414-2736
1615 Delaware St
Longview, WA
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Davis, Sch Of Med, Davis Ca 95616
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Francois Aspesberro, MD
(206) 987-2525
4800 Sand Point Way NE # 6-0061
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Cath De Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgium
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Mark R Vossler
(425) 899-0555
12333 Ne 130th Lane
Kirkland, WA
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Roberta Sue Stephenson
(253) 272-1812
1901 S Cedar St Ste 103
Tacoma, WA
Specialty
Pediatric Cardiology

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Peripheral Artery Disease

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By Vonalda M. Utterback, CN

Chances are you’ve never heard of peripheral arterial disease, often called PAD, an illness characterized by clogged arteries in the legs and other extremities. Here’s why you should know about it: This potentially deadly disease affects 8 million to 12 million Americans, yet as many as 75 percent of them experience no symptoms and haven’t a clue they have the disease.

The most common type of peripheral vascular disease, PAD occurs when extra cholesterol and other fats, called plaque, collect in the walls of arteries. This process, if left unchecked, narrows the arteries and reduces—and eventually can totally block—blood flow. PAD occurs most often in the legs, but may also affect the heart, stomach, arms, and even kidneys.

“Diagnosis is critical,” says Dennis Goodman, MD, FACC, senior cardiologist at Scripps Integrative Medicine Department in La Jolla, California. “PAD is one of the strongest risk markers for heart disease. People with PAD have a six- to seven-times higher risk of heart attack or stroke (and may even face amputation of the affected limb due to gangrene) if the disease progresses without treatment.” If that’s not enough to encourage you to arm yourself with knowledge of this disease, consider this: Severe and symptomatic PAD increases cardiovascular and coronary heart disease mortality a whopping 15-fold, according to a study conducted at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine.

Silent and insidious
PAD develops slowly over years, and symptoms may not appear until the disease has progressed to a very serious stage. “In fact, many people with PAD have no symptoms at all, at least until their leg arteries have narrowed by 60 percent or more,” adds Angila Jaeggli, ND, at the Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Kenmore, Washington.

To add to the confusion, people may mistake the most common symptom of PAD, claudication—a restriction of blood flow to the limbs resulting in fatigue, heaviness, excess tiredness, or cramping in the leg muscles during any type of exercise—as normal fatigue. Or they may chalk it up simply as a sign of aging. Adding further to the confusion, symptoms of claudication come and go, usually appearing only during exertion, which contributes to an “out of pain, out of mind” mentality. Other symptoms of severe PAD include lingering foot pain, slow-healing wounds on the feet or toes, color changes in the skin of the feet, including paleness or blueness, and erectile dysfunction.

Test it out
The initial screening for PAD is quick, inexpensive, and painless. Called the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the test offers a simple and reliable means of diagnosing the condition. The ABI measures the blood pressure of the ankle and arm at the same time using a pencil-shaped ultrasound device called a Doppler. By dividing the highest blood pressure at the ankle by the highest recorded pressure in your arm, your healthcare practitioner arrives at your ABI. Healthy a...

Author: Vonalda M. Utterback

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