Athlete's Foot Treatment Juneau AK

Tea tree oil is one of the best and most popular natural remedies used to treat athlete's foot. Clinical trials have shown applying a 25-percent to 50-percent solution of tea tree oil twice daily to the affected areas effectively treats the condition.

East Care Acupuncture Clinic
(907) 586-6668
130 Seward St, #318
Juneau, AK
 
Margretta A O'Reilly, MD
(907) 646-8500
2741 Debarr Rd Ste C307
Anchorage, AK
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Albany Med Coll, Albany Ny 12208
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Dr.Michael Cusack
(907) 562-2275
110 West 38th Avenue
Anchorage, AK
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1965
Speciality
Dermatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.4, out of 5 based on 8, reviews.

Data Provided by:
John H Bocachica, MD
(907) 729-2093
4315 Diplomacy Dr
Anchorage, AK
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny At Stony Brook Hlth Sci Ctr, Stony Brook Ny 11794
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Michael Leary Cusack, MD
(907) 562-2275
3601 C St Ste 1350
Anchorage, AK
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
Fortson, Jayne MD - Dermatology Dermatopathology
(907) 563-3204
2401 E 42nd Ave, #301
Anchorage, AK
 
Thomas P Senter
(907) 276-1315
636 Barrow St
Anchorage, AK
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Kathie Lorraine Stirling, MD
(907) 456-3545
515 7th Ave Ste 130
Fairbanks, AK
Specialties
Dermatology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Fairbanks Mem Hosp/Denali Ctr, Fairbanks, Ak

Data Provided by:
Thompson, Robert G MD - Thompson Robert G MD
(907) 260-6914
188 W Marydale Dr
Soldotna, AK
 
Alaska Center for Dermatology
(907) 646-8500
3841 Piper St
Anchorage, AK
 
Data Provided by:

Painful Case of Athlete's Foot

Provided by: 

By James and Debra Rouse, ND

My idea of exercise is going to the mall, but somehow I’ve ended up with a painful case of athlete’s foot. All the drugstore products sound really toxic. Can I treat this another way?

Athlete’s foot is a fungal (tinea) infection that affects men more than women and is characterized by itching, redness, peeling, and sometimes cracking of the skin between the toes. Start treatment at the first sign of symptoms so the fungus doesn’t spread over your whole foot. If the toenails get affected, they may become thick and discolored; at that point the fungus becomes much harder to eradicate.

Since the athlete’s foot fungus thrives under warm, moist conditions, the first place to begin fighting it is with your shoes and socks. Keeping your feet dry is your No. 1 priority, so consider wearing socks that wick moisture away from the foot and shoes made from materials that allow for better ventilation. Next look to your diet, especially your intake of simple sugars. The tinea fungus is a type of yeast, and yeast thrives on sugar. Avoid baked goods, cookies, dried fruit, and fruit juice while you treat the active infection.

Tea tree oil is one of the best and most popular natural remedies used to treat athlete’s foot. Clinical trials have shown applying a 25-percent to 50-percent solution of tea tree oil twice daily to the affected areas effectively treats the condition. Garlic, another strong antifungal agent, can also work. You can place slivers of garlic in your socks, or you can boil several cloves in water and then soak your feet in the garlic bath. Alternatively you can try soaking your feet in apple cider vinegar, which has been shown to help. With any of the soaking treatments, make sure to dry your feet well, using a clean towel.

Since yeast also thrives on a compromised immune system and an imbalance in the intestinal flora, we recommend a probiotic to support healthy growth of the “good” bugs. Take two capsules daily. Also 1 to 3 grams of vitamin C taken in divided doses throughout the day will support immunity and ward off infection.

If you don’t respond to treatment, the affected areas become red, hot, and swollen, or the blisters ooze pus—signs of secondary bacterial infection—then you really must see your doctor.

Author: James and Debra Rouse

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