Blood Sugar Specialist Beaver Dam WI

If you find yourself stuck in this high-low loop—a cycle that can lead to diabetes-related conditions like insulin resistance and insulin insensitivity—take heart, the ayurvedic herb gurmar (Gymnema sylvestre) can break you free.

Guerdon Jos Coombs, MD
Middleton, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided by:
Paul M Reber
(608) 252-8000
1313 Fish Hatchery Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Data Provided by:
Melissa Meredith, MD
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Ghufran S Babar
(414) 805-3666
9000 W Wisconsin Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialty
Pediatric Endocrinology

Data Provided by:
Alan Kenneth Mc Kenzie, MD
(715) 532-2345
1000 N Oak Ave
Marshfield, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1969
Hospital
Hospital: St Josephs Hospital, Marshfield, Wi
Group Practice: Marshfield Clinic; Ministry Health Care At Marshfield Clinic

Data Provided by:
Ellen Lancon Connor, MD
(608) 263-9059
600 Highland Ave # H4/434
Madison, WI
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Diane Elisabeth Silva, MD
(608) 782-7300
La Crosse, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Davis, Sch Of Med, Davis Ca 95616
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Sharon Lee Maby, MD
(715) 387-5185
1000 N Oak Ave
Marshfield, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cincinnati Coll Of Med, Cincinnati Oh 45267
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided by:
Charles Thomas Bingham, MD
(715) 838-6594
1400 Bellinger St
Eau Claire, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Gregory Burton Pehling, MD
(608) 775-8900
3111 Gunderson Rd
Onalaska, WI
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
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Normalize your Blood Sugar

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By Vonalda M. Utterback, CN

Hunger suddenly strikes. You need food, and you need it now. You rummage for that long-lost candy bar buried somewhere in your desk—anything to get a sugar fix.

That rapid rise in blood glucose, along with the attendant release of the “feel-good” hormone serotonin, may make you feel better in the short term, but when your glucose levels soon nosedive, you’ll return to your low-serotonin state—a prime candidate for yet more sugar craving.

If you find yourself stuck in this high-low loop—a cycle that can lead to diabetes-related conditions like insulin resistance and insulin insensitivity—take heart, the ayurvedic herb gurmar (Gymnema sylvestre) can break you free.

The leaves of this woody climbing plant have been used in India for more than 2,000 years to treat “honey urine” (diabetes) or high blood sugar levels, says Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa, registered herbalist and author of The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs (2007, Lotus Press). “In my practice, I’ve experienced excellent results using gurmar to lower and maintain normalized blood sugar levels,” he says, “and I’ve seen my clients with type-2 diabetes lower or, in some cases, even eliminate the need for oral hypoglycemic medicines or insulin.”

No one knows exactly how the herb accomplishes this, says Khalsa, but current evidence points to a trio of possible mechanisms. Gurmar may increase insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, heighten overall cell sensitivity to insulin, and/or decrease the gut’s glucose or lipid absorption.

A number of positive clinical studies support gurmar’s effectiveness. In one, published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, University of Madras researchers gave 400 mg a day of a water-soluble extract of gurmar leaves to 22 type-2 diabetic participants for 18 to 20 months. “Gurmar showed the potential to help pancreatic repair, raising the output of insulin to normal levels,” reports Khalsa.

In his practice, Khalsa typically recommends taking the raw, dried leaf in capsule form in a wide range of dosages (15 mg to 500 grams per day), depending on the individual’s needs. He suggests starting with a low dose and increasing it gradually until serum glucose reaches normal range. Keep in mind that it may take several months of taking gurmar to see results. Of course, if diagnosed with diabetes, always consult your healthcare practitioner before making any changes to your medication.

And what about those sugar cravings? When placed directly on the tongue, gurmar alters the taste of sugar from sweet to bitter by depressing the tongue’s “sweet” receptors. The effect only lasts 15 minutes, Khalsa says—but that’s just enough time to find some complex carbs or other low-glycemic food to substitute for that afternoon Snickers.

Author: Vonalda M. Utterback, CN

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