Cardiovascular Disease Specialist Winnetka CA

Cardiovascular disease caused more than one third of all deaths in the US in 2004, making it the nation’s No. 1 killer. Confronted with that grim statistic, one could venture we’ve been missing something. Two new studies suggest what that might be—fruits and vegetables full of vitamin C and a daily dose of sunshine.

Sandra P Fallon MD
(310) 453-4455
2020 Santa Monica Blvd
Santa Monica, CA
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Ramesh Kumar Arora, MD
(818) 994-0616
PO Box 3146
Chatsworth, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Coll Of Med Scis, Univ Of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Leonard Philip Haber, MD
(818) 782-5041
9820 Beckford Ave
Northridge, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1954

Data Provided by:
Afshine A Emrani
(818) 996-4100
18370 Burbank Blvd
Tarzana, CA
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Allan Irvin Rosenbluth, MD
(818) 365-9595
17075 Devonshire St Ste 201
Northridge, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Lisa Matzer
(818) 840-9200
2121 W Magnolia Blvd
Burbank, CA
Business
Lisa Matzer, M.D., a Professional Corporation
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Preventive Health
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Aetna, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Cigna, United, Medicare, Healthcare Partners, Pacific Care, Motion Picture, and many other insurances
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Providence St. Joseph Burbank
Residency Training: Cedars Sinai
Medical School: Yale University, 1988
Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided by:
Manohar Deosaran Singh, MD
(818) 363-4088
10231 Aura Ave
Northridge, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1956

Data Provided by:
Carmen Julia Botero, MD
(818) 343-5794
18887 Carmel Crest Dr
Tarzana, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Pontificia Bolivariana, Fac De Med, Medellin, Colombia
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
Richard Philip Cain, MD
(818) 344-4800
5525 Etiwanda Ave Ste 217
Tarzana, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cincinnati Coll Of Med, Cincinnati Oh 45267
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Marc Ehrich, MD
(818) 345-5580
18370 Burbank Blvd Ste 707
Tarzana, CA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
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New Ways to a Healthy Heart

Provided by: 

By Kris Kucera

Cardiovascular disease caused more than one third of all deaths in the US in 2004, making it the nation’s No. 1 killer. Confronted with that grim statistic, one could venture we’ve been missing something. Two new studies suggest what that might be—fruits and vegetables full of vitamin C and a daily dose of sunshine. In the first study, conducted at the University of Cambridge, researchers charted the vitamin C plasma concentrations of more than 20,000 Europeans between the ages of 40 and 79 for nearly a decade and documented their rates of stroke. “People in the top 25 percent of vitamin C concentrations had a 42 percent lower risk of stroke over 10 years versus those in the bottom 25 percent,” says lead researcher Phyo Myint, MD. “And the effect was independent of major classical risk factors.” Noting that few studies show vitamin C supplements alone prevent stroke, Myint posits that other goodies found naturally in fruit and vegetables, such as bioflavonoids and plant sterols, probably play important complementary roles in stroke prevention.

The second study, at Harvard Medical School, examined more than 1,700 people with hypertension over an average of five and a half years. It found that the participants with vitamin D deficiencies were twice as likely to have heart attacks, strokes, or other serious cardiovascular events than the participants with normal vitamin D levels. Most experts agree that 15 minutes of sun each day or 1,000 mg daily of vitamin D supplements will give you what you need.

Author: Kris Kucera

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