Neurologists Washington DC

See below to find Parkinson specialists in Washington that give access to expertise on signs of Parkinson's disease, idiopathic Parkinson disease, tremors, and living with Parkinson's disease, as well as advice and content on movement disorders.

Paul Mark Hoffman, MD
(202) 408-3600
Medical Research Svc 121
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med, Gainesville Fl 32610
Graduation Year: 1967

Data Provided by:
Marvin William Jackson, MD
2251 Sherman Ave NW # 120E
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Los Angeles, Ucla Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90024
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Chitra Ramabhadran Chari, MD
(202) 675-7128
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bj Med Coll, Univ Of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
Georges F Mc Cormick, MD
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, San Francisco, Sch Of Med, San Francisco Ca 94143
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Dr.Richard Restak
(202) 462-0455
1800 R St NW # C3
Washington, DC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1966
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.2, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Michael Huang, MD
(202) 444-7371
616 E St NW Apt 1101
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2003

Data Provided by:
Alice O Adams
(202) 865-1546
2041 Georgia Ave Nw
Washington, DC
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Murray Goldstein, DO
(202) 973-7140
1660 L St NW Ste 700
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Richard Martin Restak, MD
(202) 462-0455
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided by:
Armando Oliva, MD
(301) 594-5517
Washington, DC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
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New Hope for Parkinson�s

Provided by: 

By Jennie Lay

At first, Sally Sweeney’s hands trembled just enough to make holding the morning newspaper tough. Then, on long walks, her right arm would stop its natural swinging. Her always-precise handwriting suddenly looked a little off. The active, 52-year-old mother of four figured she had a pinched nerve or something. Finally, she began having trouble knitting: Her fingers felt slow and tangled, like wearing mittens to play Pick-Up Sticks. She couldn’t ignore the pesky symptoms any longer.

That was 1995, the summer Sweeney was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, a chronic and progressive neurological disorder. The neurons had already started dying in the part of her brain called the substantia nigra. This area produces dopamine, a vital neurotransmitter responsible for smooth motor skills. People have likened Parkinson’s to a thief that gradually and unexpectedly robs you of movement, control, and energy. “Parkinson’s makes you want to sit in your chair and not get up,” Sweeney says. “It makes you feel awkward and uncoordinated, achy and tired.” As the disease progresses, the incremental loss of dopamine results in tremors, muscle rigidity, slowness of movement, impaired balance, and eventually incapacitation. But Sweeney, now 65 and a self-employed kitchen designer in rural Kansas, remains undeterred: “From the very beginning, I did everything I could to stave it off.”

Beyond drugs
No cure for Parkinson’s disease exists. Instead, medications attempt to replace or mimic the brain’s dopamine. While the drugs do curb the symptoms up to a point, their effectiveness diminishes over time, so dosages often must increase dramatically. But at this point, no level of drug therapy can stop the destruction of brain cells in the substantia nigra, explains David Perlmutter, MD, a board-certified neurologist in Naples, Florida, who is recognized for his innovative approaches to neurological disorders. Medications come with side effects as well, such as depression, extreme daytime drowsiness, involuntary jerky movements, insomnia, dizziness, and hallucinations.

Like almost all Parkinson’s patients, Sweeney started on medication to reduce symptoms right after she was diagnosed. Wanting to take as few drugs as possible, however, she also searched for alternative solutions to slow the disease. She began getting acupuncture, taking antioxidant supplements, practicing yoga, lifting weights with a trainer, and volunteering each week at a Parkinson’s foundation office where she could stay on top of new research. Today, almost 13 years after her diagnosis, Sweeney says her Parkinson’s disease, remarkably, “isn’t that bad ... I am way ahead of most people after 13 years.”

She credits her strong health to having melded the medications and expertise of conventional medicine with holistic treatments, diet, and exercise. She’s not alone in her adoption of alternative therapies. More and more patients, practitioners, and researchers are beginning to understan...

Author: Jennie Lay

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...

Spotlight on Epilepsy

Provided by: 

By Wendy Meyeroff

Donna Andrews was an 18-year-old college freshman the day her life twisted out of control.

“It was St. Patrick’s Day, March 17,” she says. “I’d been feeling weak and exhausted all morning, and I thought I had the flu.” Beyond that, her memories of the day are blurry. She knows that she fell, and vaguely remembers “being jostled around by paramedics.” Then she slipped into a coma and stayed there for six weeks.

When she awoke, doctors said she had been ill with viral encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain that left her with damaged neural pathways. “It was as if I had holes in my brain,” she says. An enormous chunk of her memory (including her ability to read and write) was gone, and she’d developed epilepsy, experiencing up to ten seizures a day.

Her doctors doubted she could make a full recovery. And indeed, after nearly two years, she’d regained only about 40 percent of the abilities she’d lost. She couldn’t even leave the house alone, in case a seizure struck. Still, her neurologist said there was nothing else to be done.

Fast-forward to today. Believe it or not, it’s been more than three decades since Andrews’s last seizure. During that time, she was able to earn not only her college degree, but also a Ph.D. in clinical psychology. Along with Joel Reiter, a Harvard-trained neurologist, she directs the Andrews-Reiter Epilepsy Research Program in Santa Rosa, California, where she works to help other epilepsy sufferers like herself.

Most people who control their epilepsy do so with medication, but the key to Andrews’s recovery was quite different. Two years after her diagnosis, she realized that her seizures came in response to certain stressful triggers. So she decided to change the way she responded to stress, in the hope that she’d be better able to manage her disease. As she learned to unhook from stress—taking breaks when she felt her frustration level mounting, for instance, or breathing slowly and deeply—the frequency of her seizures diminished. Seven years after she developed epilepsy, doctors took her off all her medications.

That was back in the 1970s, when nondrug treatments for epilepsy were almost unheard of. But these days, people with epilepsy—often with the blessing of their physicians—are increasingly turning to alternative therapies to help themselves lead more normal lives, by reducing both the frequency of their seizures and the amount of medication they take. “We’ve come a long way in a generation,” says Jeffrey Cohen, a physician who is director of the adult epilepsy program at New York’s Beth Israel Medical Center.

For the 2.5 million Americans who suffer from the disorder, the shift is a welcome one. Most standard anti-seizure drugs bring numerous troublesome side effects, including grogginess, balance problems, and the potential for long-term liver damage. As Andrews discovered, getting stress under control is a crucial element for patients who hope to reduce their dependence on t...

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...

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