Natural Contact Lens Solution Boise ID

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Natural Contact Solution. You will find informative articles about Natural Contact Solution, including "On the Horizon: Natural Moisture for Your Contacts". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Boise, ID that can help answer your questions about Natural Contact Solution.

John R SonNtag
(208) 377-3937
5680 Gage St
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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James R Swartley
(208) 342-2706
222 N 2nd St
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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James P Tweeten
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Molly J Mannschreck
(208) 373-1200
999 N. Curtis Rd
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Dr.Todd Noble
(208) 336-2020
1333 West Jefferson Street
Boise, ID
Gender
M
Speciality
Optometrist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Gregory J Kent
(208) 342-5151
901 N Curtis Rd Suite 302
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Mark E Hollingshead
(208) 336-8700
360 E Mallard Dr
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Mark D Borup
(208) 373-1200
999 N. Curtis Road
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Jon R Fishburn
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Lester Sanders
(208) 422-1000
500 W Fort St
Boise, ID
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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On the Horizon: Natural Moisture for Your Contacts

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By Kristin Bjornsen

For many of the 34 million people in the US who wear contacts, dry, itchy, red eyes can be an uncomfortable and unattractive side effect that causes them to give up entirely and reach for their glasses. Recently Canadian researchers at McMaster University figured out how to attach hyaluronic acid—the body’s natural lubricant—directly to contact lenses. Found in our skin and joints, hyaluronic acid is an extremely “water-loving substance whose function is to absorb H2O,” says lead researcher Heather Sheardown. “When attached to a lens, it creates a layer of water that moistens your eye.” And since the hyaluronic acid stays permanently attached to the lens, the moisturizing effects are long-lasting. Holistic ophthalmologist Robert Abel Jr., MD, in Delaware, says the new technology—which should be available in about two years—sounds promising, though only time will tell how well it works. In the meantime, Abel suggests these tips to keep your peepers happy:

Supplement with omega-3s (about 1,000 mg of DHA) daily, so your tears have enough oil in them and don’t evaporate as quickly.

“Eliminate artificial sweeteners, which overstimulates nerve endings in the eye, leading to irritation,” says Abel.

Remember to blink frequently, especially when looking at a computer screen, reading, or writing.

Use preservative-free artificial teardrops. Otherwise, you can develop allergies to the preservatives. Try homeopathic Optique 1 by Boiron.

Get a humidifier for your bedroom and office, and clean the vents in your home.
—Kristin Bjornsen

Author: Kristin Bjornsen

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