Joint Disorder Specialist Bel Air MD

Unfortunately, despite decades of research, we still don’t know what causes TMJD. But strong evidence suggests excessive use of the jaw muscles (grinding or clenching the teeth and jaws, known as bruxis), trauma tothe joint from an accident, and, of course, stress all play a role.

Ashu Paul Mehta, MD
(847) 723-5878
9110 Georgia Belle Dr
Perry Hall, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ross Univ, Sch Of Med & Vet Med, Roseau, Dominica
Graduation Year: 1997

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Lynn M Ludmer
(410) 494-1888
1220b E Joppa Rd
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Howard W Hauptman
(410) 494-1888
1220b E Joppa Rd
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

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Raymond Wesley Wilson
(410) 825-0688
6565 N Charles St
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

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Megan Elizabeth Clowse, MD
(443) 849-3694
6701 N Charles St Rm 5105
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Vanderbilt Univ Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37232
Graduation Year: 1999

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Andrea S Marx, MD
(410) 494-1888
1220B E Joppa Rd Ste 310
Towson, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1988

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Dr.Howard Hauptman
(410) 494-1888
1220 E Joppa Rd # B-310
Towson, MD
Gender
M
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.2, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

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Tariq Mahmood, MD
201 Back River Neck Rd Ste 109
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: King Edward Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1971

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Andrea Marx
(410) 337-7780
120 Sister Pierre Dr Ste 507
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

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Mala Mehta, MD
(703) 471-6550
5601 Loch Raven Blvd
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1990

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Muscular and Joint Disorders

Provided by: 

By Sam Dworkin, dds, phd, professor emeritus of psychiatry, behavioral sciences and oral medicine at the University of Washington Schools of Medicine and Dentistry

Assuming your dentist has already ruled out arthritis or a traumatic injury as the cause of your TMJD, yes, natural treatments will ease the pain without surgery or heavy drugs. TMJD (temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders) refers to problems with the chewing muscles (the masseter in your cheek and temporalis by your temple) or temporomandibular joint that cause persistent pain and even jaw lock. TMJD affects women much more than men (80 percent of people seeking treatment are female)—specifically women in their reproductive years (18 to 45). While no clear reason for this disparity exists, women appear to have less effective pain control during the low estrogen part of their cycle (right before and during menstruation), and the rapid fluctuations in estrogen throughout the reproductive years also seem to increase pain. This may partially explain why TMJD pain occurs much less frequently in postmenopausal women who are not on hormone replacement therapy—HRT has been linked to higher likelihood of jaw pain.

Unfortunately, despite decades of research, we still don’t know what causes TMJD. But strong evidence suggests excessive use of the jaw muscles (grinding or clenching the teeth and jaws, known as bruxis), trauma tothe joint from an accident, and, of course, stress all play a role. Stress causes widespread changes in your body—almost all of them negative—from increased muscle tension to neurological changes and even depression. Managing stress, dealing with bottled-up emotions, and a little TLC for your TMJ will help you alleviate, and possibly eliminate, your pain.

Getting to know your pain
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is particularly effective in treating chronic pain, anxiety, and depression. CBT helps you notice your body’s reaction to stress—how stress heightens pain and other symptoms (think tension in the body and jaw). It then offers simple techniques like guided imagery and relaxation exercises to reduce not only the experience of stress but also its impact on the body—increased muscle tension, heart rate, and blood pressure, all of which exacerbate pain everywhere in the body. It’s best to work with a trained CBT therapist, but start with this simple exercise:
Counter the tension in the jaw by licking your lips slightly and then swallowing. Allow the jaw to remain in the position it naturally takes immediately after swallowing—teeth slightly apart and lips lightly touching. This natural position leaves the big chewing muscles relaxed. Practice this for three to five minutes several times a day.
Monitor your pain. A couple of times a day, take a moment to rate your pain on a scale from zero to 10, and look for patterns over time. Is your pain worse in the mornings? Do certain emotions affect it? What seems to trigger or relieve the pain?

TLC...

Author: Sam Dworkin, dds, phd

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