Cow Disease Treatment Manchester NH

The threat of mad cow disease is worth taking seriously for all the reasons you’ve already heard. But the most frightening aspect of the story is one that no one is talking about. For almost 15 years, the government and the scientific community have known that the human form of the disease, a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or CJD, is sometimes misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s.

Jenny Craig
(866) 622-9370
40 March Ave
Manchester, NH
Alternate Phone Number
(866) 622-9370
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Linda H Weiss
(603) 668-6629
1245 Elm St
Manchester, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Laurie A Campbell
(603) 695-2790
100 Hitchcock Way
Manchester, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Amanda B Leach
(603) 472-2846
360 Route 101,# 10
Bedford, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Jenny Craig
(866) 622-9370
483 Amherst St
Nashua, NH
Alternate Phone Number
(866) 622-9370
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Dena's Natural Way
(603) 622-6555
1500 S Willow St,# P4
Manchester, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Dartmouth-Hitchcock
(603) 695-2500
100 Hitchcock Way,# 2
Manchester, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Erica A Mumford
(603) 557-8047
82 Palomino Ln,# 501
Bedford, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Natural Medicine Of NE
(603) 673-5331
159 Savage Rd
Milford, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Patricia A Hunter
(603) 891-4400
173 Daniel Webster Hwy
Nashua, NH
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Mad About Cow Disease

Provided by: 

By Burton Goldberg

Two months ago, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will expand its testing for mad cow disease in this country after it was discovered in one cow last December. Now the USDA will evaluate more than 200,000 animals, ten times the number tested last year. Still, that’s not nearly enough—35 million cattle are slaughtered annually.

The threat of mad cow disease is worth taking seriously for all the reasons you’ve already heard. But the most frightening aspect of the story is one that no one is talking about. For almost 15 years, the government and the scientific community have known that the human form of the disease, a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or CJD, is sometimes misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s. In a University of Pittsburgh study, researchers found that in 37 percent of cases, doctors made a mistake in diagnosing several different kinds of dementia, including CJD. So it’s possible that some purported cases of Alzheimer’s are really CJD.

Why haven’t there been any large-scale studies to investigate CJD? It’s at least partly due to the highly infectious nature of the disease: Pathologists and medical examiners don’t want to do the autopsies. Among other reasons, they’d have to destroy their instruments afterwards.

Meanwhile, though minimally better testing measures are in place, nothing else has really changed to limit the incidence of mad cow, which is characterized by the presence of abnormal infectious proteins called prions that accumulate in the brain. Discovered by Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner, prions are primarily found in the brain and nervous system and can survive all normal eradication techniques, even incineration. Some scientists believe they can persist in the soil for years. But according to physican and mad cow expert Michael Greger, who’s affiliated with Cornell University, the most common way they travel is through tainted meat products. This is how cows are believed to have originally contracted mad cow, by eating sheep remnants infected with the sheep version of the disease, called scrapie.

So what were cows doing eating sheep in the first place? After all, cows are ruminants; they eat grass and are by nature vegetarian. But the industry, with a wink and a nod from the USDA, has sought to change the natural order of things. In a dual strategy aiming both to deal with the waste products of the abattoir and to more cheaply fatten up their wares, cattlemen have for years rendered all the unused parts of livestock carcasses–bone, brains, blood, fat, nerve tissue–and then fed them back to cattle as a readily available form of protein, thus turning their herds into cannibals.

This practice has long been known to be the leading cause of the spread of mad cow, but the USDA resisted acting against it, despite the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s (NCBA) own admission that it could find economical alternatives to feeding slaughterhouse waste to animals. (The agency c...

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