Dystonia Specialist Inver Grove Heights MN

Dystonia is the third most common movement disorder, next to Parkinson’s disease and Tremor, affecting at least 300,000 people in North America. It is a neurological condition that results in sustained and involuntary contractions of opposing muscles, which leads to spasmodic movements, twisting, and abnormal stances.

Scott Mitchell Lewis, MD
(612) 725-2282
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Moeen A Masood, MD
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Dr.Michael Frost
(651) 241-5290
225 Smith Ave N # 201
Saint Paul, MN
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1975
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Dr.Neil Dahlquist
(651) 291-1559
360 Sherman St # 350
Saint Paul, MN
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis
Year of Graduation: 1975
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.3, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Dr.Wylie Zhu
(952) 993-2079
225 Smith Ave N # 200
Saint Paul, MN
Gender
M
Speciality
Neurosurgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.8, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Bruce Donald Snyder, MD
(612) 371-1600
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided by:
A Malvarez Espinosa, MD
(612) 863-4070
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Cetec, Sch Of Med, Santo Domingo, Dom Rep (Closed 1984)
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
DeAnna L Dickens
(651) 241-5290
225 Smith Ave N
Saint Paul, MN
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Patricia Ellen Penovich, MD
(612) 220-5290
310 Smith Ave N Ste 300
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: United Hospital, Saint Paul, Mn
Group Practice: Minnesota Epilepsy Group Pa

Data Provided by:
George Adam
(651) 291-2551
514 Saint Peter St
Saint Paul, MN
Specialty
Neurology

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Life with Dystonia

Provided by: 

By Ellen L. Weisberg, PhD

Dystonia is the third most common movement disorder, next to Parkinson’s disease and Tremor, affecting at least 300,000 people in North America. It is a neurological condition that results in sustained and involuntary contractions of opposing muscles, which leads to spasmodic movements, twisting, and abnormal stances. Like Parkinson’s disease, dystonia is believed to be due to an abnormality in the basal ganglia of the brain, where movement is controlled.

The symptoms of dystonia first surfaced when I was in the middle of a radio shift, getting ready to record what I thought would be another effortless 30-second broadcast in a string of reports. Halfway through it, the left side of my mouth started twisting inward, making it difficult for me to talk. At the time, I remember wondering if there was something with my delivery style that had- over time- become subtly different… Was my chair too high or too low and I was straining my neck to get to the microphone? Did it have to do with the amount of gesturing I was doing with my hands when I talked?

As time went on, though, the difficulties I was having with my broadcasting increased, and getting the job done comfortably and in a timely fashion was becoming more and more of a struggle. My coworkers thought that maybe I was having sudden “stage fright,” or that it was simply stress that was causing this, since my conversational speech away from the microphone seemed normal. It was only when I saw a neurologist that the situation became clearer: I was diagnosed with a “focal dystonia,” which targets a specific part of the body and usually afflicts people at mid-life. My condition, “task- specific oromandibular dystonia,” causes the jaw to either be clamped shut or held open and is brought on at least in part by repetitive movements. I had been doing two and a half years of daily broadcasting for hours on end, repeating similar phrases and articulating in a way that was different from my regular, away-from-the-microphone speech. I tried to return to broadcasting several times when the symptoms of the dystonia had temporarily quieted down, only to have to quit again when the condition would relapse. The symptoms eventually slipped over into my conversational speech, and there were times they were so debilitating that I thought I’d never be able to hold a normal conversation again.

I had consulted a second neurologist who prescribed Artane, an anticholinergic agent that improves muscle control in Parkinson’s patients. After a brief honeymoon, “fool’s gold”-kind of experience with the drug that lasted only a few days during which my speech seemed more effortless, the Artane lost its effects. My neurologist also tried administering Botox injections on the side of my mouth where muscles were twisting in such a way as to make speaking difficult. However, it was shortly after the injections that the condition relapsed to the point where I could barely talk at all. Continuing...

Author: Ellen L. Weisberg, PhD

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