Kidney Stone Treatment Athens AL

Kidney stones develop when minerals form crystals in the urine and build up inside the kidney, bladder, or ureter. Although researchers don’t know for sure what makes certain people more susceptible than others to forming stones, contributing factors include a diet high in protein or calcium, inadequate water consumption, a family history of the condition, and a history of urinary tract infections.

Nauman Qureshi, MD
(256) 232-0801
1005 W Market St Ste 16
Athens, AL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: King Edward Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1975

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Nauman Qureshi
(256) 232-0801
1005 W Market St Ste 16
Athens, AL
Specialty
Nephrology

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James D Gifford, MD
(256) 303-5585
1215 7th St SE Ste 220
Decatur, AL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Decatur General Hosp, Decatur, Al
Group Practice: Nephrology Of North Alabama

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Reginald D Gladish, MD
(256) 340-0012
1215 7th St SE Ste 220
Decatur, AL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1993

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Daniel Gifford, MD
(256) 340-0012
1215 7th St SE Ste 220
Decatur, AL
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Dr.Nauman Qureshi
(256) 232-0801
1005 W Market St # 16
Athens, AL
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: King Edward Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Lahore
Year of Graduation: 1975
Speciality
Nephrologist
General Information
Hospital: Athens -Limestone Hosp, Athens, Al
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Milton A Padgett, DO
(256) 837-2271
PO Box 888
Madison, AL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Kirksville Coll Of Osteo Med, Kirksville Mo 63501
Graduation Year: 1987

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Reginald Dwain Gladish
(256) 340-0012
1216 Somerville Road Se
Decatur, AL
Specialty
Nephrology

Data Provided by:
James Daniel Gifford
(256) 340-0012
1216 Somerville Road Se
Decatur, AL
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Nephrology

Data Provided by:
James Monroe Smelser, MD
(256) 533-7676
810 Franklin St SE Ste A
Huntsville, AL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1990
Hospital
Hospital: Huntsville Hosp -East, Huntsville, Al
Group Practice: Huntsville Renal Clinic

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Kicking Kidney Stones

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By Matthew Solan

If you’ve ever passed a kidney stone, it’s something you never want to repeat. And if you haven’t, you may be on borrowed time—a little more than 5 percent of adults will have at least one kidney stone episode by age 70, says Leslie Spry, MD, of the National Kidney Foundation. “Men can expect an incidence of one in 15 in their lifetime and women one in 24,” he says.

Kidney stones develop when minerals form crystals in the urine and build up inside the kidney, bladder, or ureter. Although researchers don’t know for sure what makes certain people more susceptible than others to forming stones, contributing factors include a diet high in protein or calcium, inadequate water consumption, a family history of the condition, and a history of urinary tract infections.

Herbal tea to the rescue
In addition to proper hydration (drink at least one-half of your body weight in ounces of water daily), certain herbs may help to ease the pain of existing stones and prevent new ones, says Robert Linde, an herbalist with Acupuncture and Herbal Therapies in St. Petersburg, Florida. Take the following herbs in tea form by adding the suggested amount of dried herb to 3 cups hot water. Let steep covered for 10 minutes, and drink one-half to 1 cup three to five times daily.

II Gravel root
(Eupatorium purpureum) breaks down stones and makes them easier to pass (1 tablespoon).

II Kava (Piper methysticum), a muscle relaxer, makes episodes less painful (1 to 2 tablespoons depending on the severity). Avoid if you have liver problems, says Linde.

II Jamaica dogwood (Piscidia piscipula) relieves sharp pain that may accompany kidney stones (1 to 2 tablespoons). Skip this one, too, if you suffer from liver ailments.

II Corn silk
(Zea mays) soothes irritation in the urinary system (1 to 2 tablespoons).

II Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) cleanses the kidneys and gently increases urine output to help prevent future stones (3 tablespoons fresh; for capsules, follow dosage on label).

II Goldenrod (Solidago virgaurea) increases urine production and helps cleanse the kidneys (1 tablespoon).

A Yin-Yang problem
From the Eastern perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), kidney stones form because of a deficiency in either yin or yang, says Roger Wicke, PhD, a TCM herbalist and director of the Rocky Mountain Herbal Institute in Hot Springs, Montana. “Characteristics of a kidney yin deficiency are constant thirst, weakness, and agitation—all signs of dehydration and depleted fluids,” Wicke says. If Wicke suspects a lack of yin, he often prescribes the herbal formula liu wei di huang to help promote a greater flow of fluids through the kidneys.

A yang deficiency, on the other hand, brings fatigue, coldness, and a tendency to bloat after drinking water. “To balance yang, you need to increase urine production, which requires strengthening the spleen and kidneys and increasing the flow of urine,” says Wicke. In this instance, Wicke sug...

Author: Matthew Solan

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