PCOS Specialist Westport CT

By and large, the most common reason for persistent irregularity is PCOS. Characterized by an excessive amount of estrogen and androgen (male hormone), coupled with insulin resistance, PCOS leads to anovulation (failure to release an egg from the ovary) and irregular menses.

Marc Storch
(203) 226-1243
156 Kings Hwy N # 156
Westport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Phyliss Shapiro
(203) 222-1050
728 Post Rd E
Westport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Martha Small
(203) 452-8322
2600 Post Rd # 204
Southport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Kathleen Scarbrough
(203) 254-3886
2600 Post Rd # 1L
Southport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Christina Y Chang, MD
(203) 801-4318
39 Pine St
New Canaan, CT
Business
Fairfield County Obstetrics & Gynecology LLC
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Julianne Icatar
(203) 222-1050
728 Post Rd E
Westport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Barbara Sager
(203) 254-3886
2600 Post Rd # 1L
Southport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Elenita Espina
(203) 259-3055
2600 Post Road
Southport, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Carla Williams
(203) 662-0609
40 Heights Rd # 202
Darien, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
David Parnas
(203) 849-1222
2 Park St
Norwalk, CT
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Irregular Periods

Provided by: 

Teraona Low Dog, MD, is the director of the fellowship for the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona School of Medicine.

A.First off, keep in mind that regular is relative. Many women believe that if their periods don’t come every 28 days, something is wrong with them. But if you have a consistent cycle of 35 or even 40 days, that’s normal for you. That said, roughly 30 percent of women have irregular periods at some point, and some fluctuation is fine—during puberty, perimenopause, and after pregnancy or breast-feeding. Even women with regular menses can skip a cycle now and then due to stress, travel, or other hiccups in their routine, and it’s nothing to worry about.

But if you’re going months without menstruating or feel like you never know when your period will come, that’s irregular. If you haven’t already, you should see your doctor and get checked for abnormalities that could affect your cycle—hormonal imbalances caused by a thyroid problem and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are the most common. Even tiny disruptions in prolactin, cortisol, or other hormones can disrupt a woman’s menstrual cycle. An overactive thyroid can cause scant or absent periods, while an underactive thyroid can lead to irregular cycles with heavy bleeding.

By and large, the most common reason for persistent irregularity is PCOS. Characterized by an excessive amount of estrogen and androgen (male hormone), coupled with insulin resistance, PCOS leads to anovulation (failure to release an egg from the ovary) and irregular menses. Women with PCOS may have cysts (typically small and benign) on their ovaries, acne, and excessive hair growth on the chin or upper lip; they may also be overweight, obese, or have difficulty getting pregnant. It also increases your risk for developing estrogen-driven cancers (breast and uterine), heart disease, and diabetes due to long-term exposure to high levels of insulin.

Sounds serious, but you can get your cycle back on track (and even treat PCOS) with diet, exercise, weight management, and herbs.
Healthy diet, healthy cycle
Eating the right foods and supplementing for optimal nutrient absorption can help you get regular. Some guidelines:
Follow a low-glycemic, low-fat diet, and reduce your intake of refined carbohydrates. This helps to reduce insulin resistance—one of the main drivers of anovulation and hormone imbalance—and is especially important if you have PCOS.
Take a multivitamin, and make sure you get the daily requirements for calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D. While these supplements won’t correct your menstrual irregularity, studies show that women with infrequent, irregular periods may be at greater risk for osteoporosis later in life.
Take an iron supplement with vitamin C (to enhance iron absorption) if your doctor says you’re anemic. If you bleed heavily or for longer than the normal three to five days, you may be at risk for anemia.

The stress factor
Since stre...

Author: Teraona Low Dog, MD

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