MS Specialist Martinsville IN

MS affects the brain and the central nervous system (CNS), and the CNS pretty much controls everything we say, do, feel, see, and think. With MS, the immune system goes haywire and begins attacking the healthy insulating tissue (myelin) that protects the axons in the brain.

Rudolph Wilfred Taubner, MD
(812) 339-5771
Bloomington, IN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Alberta, Fac Of Med, Edmonton, Alb, Canada
Graduation Year: 1967

Data Provided by:
James C Passas MD
(317) 962-1600
1633 N Capitol Ave
Indianapolis, IN
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
George Andrew Wilson Jr, MD
(318) 443-4576
1530 N 7th St
Terre Haute, IN
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Robert M Pascuzzi
(317) 274-8800
1050 Wishard Blvd
Indianapolis, IN
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Albert C Lee
(765) 448-3040
3731 Rome Dr
Lafayette, IN
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Charles Edgar Rehn, MD
(313) 738-4011
Bargersville, IN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1970
Hospital
Hospital: Johnson Mem Hosp, Franklin, In; Methodist Hosp Of Indiana, Indianapolis, In
Group Practice: Hoosier Neurology Pc

Data Provided by:
Henry J Matick DO
(812) 886-6608
621 S 7th St
Vincennes, IN
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Peter Kovacs, MD
(812) 481-5781
721 W 13th St
Jasper, IN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Semmelweis Orvostudomanyi Egyetem (Peter Pazmany Univ), Budapest
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
Leo Thomas D'Ambrosio, MD
(317) 859-1020
5136 E Stop 11 Rd Ste 26
Indianapolis, IN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: St Francis Hosp And Health Ctr, Beech Grove, In; Comm Hosp-Indiana, Indianapolis, In; St Francis South Campus, Indianapolis, In
Group Practice: Josephson Wallack Munshower Neurology Pc

Data Provided by:
Masaru Kaneko, MD
545 Barnhill Dr
Indianapolis, IN
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Chiba Univ, Fac Of Med, Chiba, Japan
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
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Inside MS

Provided by: 

By Michelle Theall

Ask 10 different people with multiple sclerosis (MS) what the disease feels like and you will likely get 10 different answers. It’s a bit like the story of the blind man and the elephant. When the man feels the elephant’s trunk, he believes he has touched a snake. He holds the tusk and envisions a pointy marble spire. As he places his hands on the elephant’s foot, he describes a giant tree trunk. In a way, MS is like that elephant. Those touched by it never know how it will feel, even though each rough patch is part of the same animal. Depending on where the attack occurs and how severe the scarring, this progressive autoimmune disease may manifest as numbness, paralysis, memory and cognitive function problems, blindness, bowel and bladder issues, fatigue, muscle spasms, painful sensations, and a host of other unpleasant symptoms.

I have MS, and it often feels like I’m sprinting underwater with someone sitting on my shoulders—off-balance, impenetrable, and weighty. At other times, it presents itself as relentless vibrations coursing through my feet, hands, arms, and face. After three years with this disease, I’m still not sure how it will announce itself on a given day, but its presence is undeniable.

Getting to Know the Elephant
How can MS vary so much within and between individuals? MS affects the brain and the central nervous system (CNS), and the CNS pretty much controls everything we say, do, feel, see, and think. With MS, the immune system goes haywire and begins attacking the healthy insulating tissue (myelin) that protects the axons in the brain. In my case, the misdirected siege caused nine or so plaques (scarred spots) in various areas of my brain. Since different sections of the brain handle different functions, any activity can be affected, depending on where the scars hit. It’s as if MS were a bolt of lightening striking the circuit breaker box in your home—some of the wires might get fried, others remain untouched. The fridge still works, but the surge erased last night’s episode of Desperate Housewives from your TiVo. When MS strikes it might cause balance or coordination problems one day; another day it may affect your memory or your vision; a month later, you may temporarily (or permanently) lose the use of your legs.

Almost 500,000 people nationwide have MS. In fact, a new person is diagnosed every hour. No one really knows what causes it, but theories abound. Some researchers suggest that a common virus like measles or herpes or even the flu may be responsible; others say a person can be born with a genetic predisposition to react to something in the environment, which will trigger an autoimmune response.

In searching for a cause and a cure, researchers look for common denominators among patient groups—and more than a few exist. This is what they know: MS strikes twice as many women as men; it prefers Caucasians between the ages of 20 and 40; it is more prevalent in geographic areas above 40 degr...

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