Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Columbia SC

It was a show about hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for children with cerebral palsy, a motor disorder caused by a brain defect that appears at birth, or shortly thereafter.

Diana Fernandez, MD
(803) 254-6391
1333 Taylor St Ste 1C
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Esc De Med 'Juan N Corpas', Bogota, Colombia
Graduation Year: 1994

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Robert Masters Clark, MD
(803) 799-2159
2524 Canterbury Rd
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1963

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Dr.Julian C. Adams
(803) 254-6391
1333 Taylor St # 1C
Columbia, SC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1963
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Hospital: Palmetto Baptist Med Ctr -Col, Columbia, Sc
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.5, out of 5 based on 13, reviews.

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Lawrence Brooks Mauldin, MD
(803) 254-6391
PO Box 1488
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided by:
Theodore Faber, MD
(803) 254-6391
PO Box 1488
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ga Sch Of Med, Augusta Ga 30912
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Palmetto Richland Memorial Hos, Columbia, Sc; Palmetto Baptist Med Ctr -Col, Columbia, Sc
Group Practice: South Carolina Neurological

Data Provided by:
Julian C Adams
(803) 254-6391
1333 Taylor St
Columbia, SC
Specialty
Neurology

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Dr.James E. Carnes
(803) 254-6391
1333 Taylor St # 1C
Columbia, SC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1973
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Hospital: Palmetto Baptist Med Ctr -Col, Columbia, Sc
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.7, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
James E Carnes
(803) 254-6391
1333 Taylor St
Columbia, SC
Specialty
Neurology

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Gero Spencer Kragh, MD
(803) 551-0909
100 Ashland Park Ln Ste H
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1970

Data Provided by:
Benjamin Danl Paysinger, MD
(803) 782-7729
1231 Greenhill Rd
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1956

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

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By James O’brien

Five-year-old Katlyn Bryant had lost a tooth the night before. The tooth fairy duly paid a visit and Katy asked if she could spend the windfall at McDonalds. Of course, said her dad. And off they went to run errands and stop in for a burger. It was just another wonderfully mundane summer afternoon with the little girl her family describes as relentlessly social, loving, and already the family comedian.

Katy had been a joyful surprise to her parents right from the start. “We thought we couldn’t have children,” says Darin Bryant, who lives with his family in Dallas, Texas. Indeed, his wife, Janie, was scheduled for a hysterectomy when they got astonishing news: Janie was pregnant. And so their miracle baby was born, and quickly grew into an open and sweet child. She liked to recite poems, sing songs, and go to McDonalds with her father—until that afternoon in July 1998, when an oncoming van swerved into his lane and hit him and his daughter head-on, shattering Bryant’s legs, his face, and his only child’s brain.

In photographs, the car in which Katy’s skull was fractured many times over looks as though it’s been through a compactor. “They told us she wouldn’t live,” Bryant says, and then repeats the phrase, as if he’d only just heard the news yesterday. “Absolutely wouldn’t live.” But live she did, in a manner of speaking. Severe cerebral swelling choked her brain cells and threw her into a coma that would last six months.

When she finally came home from the hospital, Katlyn was alive, but only barely. Hers would be a life spent essentially unconscious, her doctors told the Bryants. She’d be unable to swallow, control her bladder or bowels, or move her arms or legs except in involuntary spasms and seizures. Her inertia would put her at constant risk for bedsores, and eventually, her arms and legs would shrivel. She’d suffer infections along with circulatory problems that could lead to strokes. And she’d require round-the-clock care just to get from one day to the next.

“She was on a cooling blanket because she couldn’t maintain her temperature,” says her father. “She was having five to ten seizures a day and was on multiple medications. She was going downhill, just totally downhill. There was nothing there. There was just no child there.”

Unfortunately, doctors can do very little for children like Katlyn Bryant. Physical therapy can keep the muscles from atrophying. Drugs can mitigate spasticity, fight infections, and get the blood flowing back to the brain. But real recovery, real progress, is rare.

The family settled in for the long haul. Nursing Katlyn became the all-consuming, and increasingly desperate, focus of their lives. Then a call came from Katlyn’s Aunt Mary. Turn on Channel 4, she said. It was a show about hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for children with cerebral palsy, a motor disorder caused by a brain defect that appears at birth, or shortly thereafter. The Bryants were intrigued: If this mysterious...

Author: James O'Brien

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