Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Brooklyn NY

It was a show about hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for children with cerebral palsy, a motor disorder caused by a brain defect that appears at birth, or shortly thereafter.

Lennart Belok
(212) 254-9716
410 East 20th Street
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Yuri Brosgol MD
(718) 648-4567
30 W End Ave
Brooklyn, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Donald C. Aberfeld
(212) 832-2905
870 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Jay E. Selman, MD
(212) 288-6060
737 Park Avenue
New York, NY
Business
Park Avenue Neurology and Sleep Medicine, PLL
Specialties
Neurology, Sleep Medicine EMG-EEG Headaches ADHD and Learning Disabilities Neuro-BOTOX
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Medicare only
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: New York Presbyterian
Residency Training: Albert Einstein College of Medicine - Jacobi Hospital, Bronx
Medical School: University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, 1973
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Neurology American Epilepsy Foundation
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided by:
John J. Caronna
(212) 746-2304
520 East 70th Street
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Lennart C Belok MD
(212) 254-9716
410 E 20th St
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Donald C Aberfeld MD
(212) 832-2905
870 United Nations Plz
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Ramon Valderrama
(212) 319-1929
30 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Robert E. Barrett
(212) 288-8874
71 East 77th St
New York, NY
Specialties
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Jay E. Selman, MD
(212) 288-6060
737 Park Avenue
New York, NY
Business
Park Avenue Neurology and Sleep Medicine, PLL
Specialties
Neurology, Adult Neurology Child Neurology Sleep Medicine Epilepsy Headaches Migraine Learning disabilities ADHD Tourette
Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: New York Presbyterian
Residency Training: Albert Einstein College of Medicine: Pediatrics: 1973-76; Neurology 1975-78.
Medical School: University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, 1973
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Acedemy of Neurology Child Neurology Society American Epilepsy Society
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided by:
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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

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By James O’brien

Five-year-old Katlyn Bryant had lost a tooth the night before. The tooth fairy duly paid a visit and Katy asked if she could spend the windfall at McDonalds. Of course, said her dad. And off they went to run errands and stop in for a burger. It was just another wonderfully mundane summer afternoon with the little girl her family describes as relentlessly social, loving, and already the family comedian.

Katy had been a joyful surprise to her parents right from the start. “We thought we couldn’t have children,” says Darin Bryant, who lives with his family in Dallas, Texas. Indeed, his wife, Janie, was scheduled for a hysterectomy when they got astonishing news: Janie was pregnant. And so their miracle baby was born, and quickly grew into an open and sweet child. She liked to recite poems, sing songs, and go to McDonalds with her father—until that afternoon in July 1998, when an oncoming van swerved into his lane and hit him and his daughter head-on, shattering Bryant’s legs, his face, and his only child’s brain.

In photographs, the car in which Katy’s skull was fractured many times over looks as though it’s been through a compactor. “They told us she wouldn’t live,” Bryant says, and then repeats the phrase, as if he’d only just heard the news yesterday. “Absolutely wouldn’t live.” But live she did, in a manner of speaking. Severe cerebral swelling choked her brain cells and threw her into a coma that would last six months.

When she finally came home from the hospital, Katlyn was alive, but only barely. Hers would be a life spent essentially unconscious, her doctors told the Bryants. She’d be unable to swallow, control her bladder or bowels, or move her arms or legs except in involuntary spasms and seizures. Her inertia would put her at constant risk for bedsores, and eventually, her arms and legs would shrivel. She’d suffer infections along with circulatory problems that could lead to strokes. And she’d require round-the-clock care just to get from one day to the next.

“She was on a cooling blanket because she couldn’t maintain her temperature,” says her father. “She was having five to ten seizures a day and was on multiple medications. She was going downhill, just totally downhill. There was nothing there. There was just no child there.”

Unfortunately, doctors can do very little for children like Katlyn Bryant. Physical therapy can keep the muscles from atrophying. Drugs can mitigate spasticity, fight infections, and get the blood flowing back to the brain. But real recovery, real progress, is rare.

The family settled in for the long haul. Nursing Katlyn became the all-consuming, and increasingly desperate, focus of their lives. Then a call came from Katlyn’s Aunt Mary. Turn on Channel 4, she said. It was a show about hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for children with cerebral palsy, a motor disorder caused by a brain defect that appears at birth, or shortly thereafter. The Bryants were intrigued: If this mysterious...

Author: James O'Brien

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