Rash Treatments Albuquerque NM

The most important step is to try to figure out whether the rash has been caused by an infection or an allergic reaction, since each of these categories will lead to an entirely different course of action.

Barrett Jay Zlotoff, MD
1021 Medical Arts Avenue NE,
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Allegheny Univ Of Hlth Sciences, Philadelphia Pa 19129
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided by:
Shwol-Huo Kiang, DO
1021 Medical Arts Avenue NE,
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Eduardo H Tschen, MD
(505) 247-4220
1203 Coal Ave SE
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ De San Carlos, Fac De Cien Med, Guatemala
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Donald Dee Harville, MD
(505) 299-4414
8200 Constitution Pl NE
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology, Dermatopathology
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Southwestern Med Ctr At Dallas, Med Sch, Dallas Tx 75235
Graduation Year: 1958
Hospital
Hospital: Presbyterian Hospital, Albuquerque, Nm; Univ Of New Mexico Hosp, Albuquerque, Nm

Data Provided by:
Walter H C Burgdorf, MD
2701 Frontier NE Ste 268 Dept Derm
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
Same Day STD Testing
(505) 717-3122
8403 Constitution Ave Ne
Albuquerque, NM
 
Robert Steven Padilla, MD
(505) 272-6000
1021 Medical Arts Avenue NE,
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nm Sch Of Med, Albuquerque Nm 87131
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
William Van H Mason, MD
(505) 842-1904
200 Oak St NE
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology, Aerospace Medicine
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1961
Hospital
Hospital: Presbyterian Hospital, Albuquerque, Nm

Data Provided by:
Dr.Matthew Thompson
(505) 262-7097
6200 Uptown Blvd NE # 410
Albuquerque, NM
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Uniformed Services Univ Of The Hlth Sci
Year of Graduation: 1989
Speciality
Dermatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Monica Romero, MD
(505) 272-6000
1021 Medical Arts Ave NE,
Albuquerque, NM
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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How to Decipher That Rash

Provided by: 

By Robert Rountree, MD

I try not to overreact every time one of my kids gets a rash, but it still freaks me out. How can I tell if it signals something serious?

When a rash suddenly appears in a normally healthy child, the first thing you should do is step back, take a deep breath, and objectively assess the situation. If the rash is spreading rapidly or showing up all over the body, or if your child is experiencing progressive symptoms such as wheezing or shortness of breath, increasingly high temperature, weakness, lethargy, or intense headache, joint aches, or muscle pains, then you are dealing with a serious situation and should immediately seek medical assistance. Any rash that doesn’t go away after a week or two also warrants professional help.

If you’ve decided that the situation is not urgent, then you can apply some detective skills by gathering clues about the physical characteristics and location of the rash and the sequence of events prior to its appearance. Even if you are unable to determine the cause, answering these questions will help describe the situation to your healthcare provider: Is the rash confined to one area, or is it widespread? Does it come and go, or does it stay in the same place? Does it have small spots, large blotches, or a diffuse redness? Is it flat, raised, or blistered? Is it pink, red, purple, etc.? Do the affected areas itch or burn? Is it scaly, crusty, or weeping?

The most important step is to try to figure out whether the rash has been caused by an infection or an allergic reaction, since each of these categories will lead to an entirely different course of action. For example, if the rash is from an infection, then your child may be contagious. If systemic symptoms such as a fever, sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, muscle aches, diarrhea, or abdominal pain preceded the rash, then you would suspect a virus (measles, roseola, chicken pox), bacteria (scarlet fever from streptococcus), or bacteria-like organisms (Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever). Recent exposure to any of these illnesses or a recent tick bite may be a tip-off.

The most dangerous rash that you could encounter in this context is from bacterial meningitis. In its initial stages, bacterial meningitis may resemble a bad cold or flu, but then things get suddenly worse with a high fever, severe headache, and joint aches. The rash is actually the result of small areas of bleeding called petechiae that occur under the skin and in the mucous membranes and the eyes. It typically begins in one region and then spreads all over the body, thus signaling a life-threatening situation.

Rashes from superficial infections may result from fungi (ringworm, athlete’s foot, diaper rash), viruses (herpes), bacteria (impetigo), or parasites (scabies and mites). Each of these rashes has a unique appearance and typical time course. An important clue is whether the child’s playmates or family members have experienced any similar problems. Recent...

Author: Robert Rountree

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