Cholecystokinin Highland Park MI

Did you know you have a special mechanism in your body that tells you when to put down that fork and stop eating? As soon as your small intestines detect fat or protein, they release a hormone, called cholecystokinin (CCK), which tells your brain you’ve had enough. If we humans are anything like laboratory rats, high-fat diets could cause our bodies to ignore this “stop-eating” hormone, making us more prone to overeating.

Jorge Antonio Vazquez, MD
(313) 916-2628
2799 West Grand Blvd CFP-1
Detroit, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pr Sch Of Med, San Juan Pr 00936
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Michael Stephen Doyle, MD
(248) 582-0100
1949 12 Mile Rd
Berkley, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1980
Hospital
Hospital: William Beaumont Hospital -Ro, Royal Oak, Mi

Data Provided by:
Wendy Michelle Miller, MD
4949 Coolidge Hwy
Royal Oak, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided by:
Community Bridges Integrated Healthcare
(734) 347-1462
42627 Garfield Road, Suite 213
Clinton Township, MI
Services
Wellness Training, Weight Management, Tai Chi, Stress Management, Reiki, Preventive Medicine, Pain Management, Other, Nutrition, Naturopathy, Mind/Body Medicine, Metabolic Medicine, Men's Health, Internal Medicine, Herbal Medicine, Geriatrics, General Practice, Family Practice, Endocrinology, Diabetes, Dermatology, Coaching, Chelation Therapy, Arthritis, Aromatherapy, Allergy
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Beaumont Family Medicine
(248) 615-3564
24230 Karim, Suite 120
Novi, MI
Services
Women's Health, Stress Management, Sports Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Nutrition, Men's Health, Herbal Medicine, Fitness/Exercise, Family Practice
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Michigan State University - College of Osteopathic Medicine
(313) 578-9600
4707 St. Antoine
Detroit, MI
Services
Stress Management, Spiritual Attunement, Public Health, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Osteopathic/Manipulation, Nutrition, Mind/Body Medicine, Medical Intuition, Functional Medicine, Fitness/Exercise, Energy Medicine, EFT, EMDR, CranioSacral Therapy, Coaching, Biofeedback
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Deighton Family Practive
(248) 849-3441
22250 Providence Drive, Suite 500
Southfield, MI
Services
Yoga, Women's Health, Stress Management, Psychosomatic Medicine, Psychiatry, Preventive Medicine, Pain Management, Obstetrics, Nutrition, Mind/Body Medicine, Meditation, Internal Medicine, General Practice, Family Practice, Diabetes, Breathwork, Ayurveda, Addiction
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Dr. Theresa Pigott
(248) 822-9253
1640 Axtell Road
Troy, MI
Specialty
Acupressure, Acupuncture, BioMeridian Testing, Chiropractors, Craniosacral Therapy, Ear Coning, EFT / TFT, Energy Healing, Guided Imagery, Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Integrative Medicine, Kinesiology, Massage Therapy, Meditation, NAET, Naturopathy, Nutrition, Physical / Exercise Therapy, Pilates, PSYCH-K, Qi Gong, Reflexology, Reiki, Tai Chi, Yoga
Associated Hospitals
Authentic Living Center

Anne Baker
(248) 891-5215
226 Walnut St.
Rochester, MI
Company
Nourish Holistic Nutrition Therapy Coach
Industry
Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Therapies : Nutritional Counseling
Insurance
None

Data Provided by:
Annette M Loduca-Duhaime
(313) 916-3677
2799 W Grand Blvd,# K-8
Detroit, MI
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Data Provided by:

High Fat Means High Hunger

Provided by: 

Did you know you have a special mechanism in your body that tells you when to put down that fork and stop eating? As soon as your small intestines detect fat or protein, they release a hormone, called cholecystokinin (CCK), which tells your brain you’ve had enough. If we humans are anything like laboratory rats, high-fat diets could cause our bodies to ignore this “stop-eating” hormone, making us more prone to overeating.

In a recent study, researchers observed two groups of rats for 20 days, one on a high-fat diet and the other on a low-fat diet. For three hours each day, they left a bunch of tasty, fatty snacks that rats love close by. The rats on high-fat diets ate as much as 40 percent more than those on low-fat diets. In the second part of the study, the researchers injected all the rats with CCK at noon and then placed food in front of them for an hour.

Because the CCK made them feel full, the rats on the low-fat diet ate much less than usual. However, the rats on the high-fat diets didn’t seem to notice CCK’s effect and kept right on eating. They had had apparently become desensitized to the hormone, say the researchers.

Human studies have shown similar results in the past. For example, in a 2003 study in the American Journal of Physiology, a group of men ate high-fat meals for two weeks and then low-fat meals for two weeks. At the end of each 14-day period, they each received an infusion of fat directly into their small intestines. These infusions triggered the release of CCK, so the participants should have felt full. But the men had the urge to stop eating only when the infusions followed their two-week, low-fat diet. When the infusion came after the high-fat weeks, the men actually felt hungrier than they did on the low-fat diet, though the amount of food they ate and their CCK levels were equal.

This suggests that their bodies were less sensitive to the effects of CCK when they ate fatty foods. Despite these findings, don’t shun fats altogether. Small to medium (not high) quantities of good fat in the diet not only promote health, but they help you feel satiated after a meal by releasing moderate amounts of CCK.

—Sarah Keough

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...