Gastroenterology Royal Oak MI

The more complex the carbohydrate, the longer it takes to break down—and the more likely it is to cause a buildup of gas. While people often point to beans and dairy products as gas producers, don’t forget these other common causes.

Hans-Juergen G Stein, MD
(248) 541-8554
1121 Crooks Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1968

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Donald Clarence Barkel, MD
1121 Crooks Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1980

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Rajiv Nair
(248) 582-1480
1695 12 Mile Rd
Berkley, MI
Specialty
Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Robert Max Truding, MD
3535 W 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Mark Vandoren Galan, MD
(248) 551-5000
3601 W 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1998

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Omar Kadro, MD
(248) 541-8554
1121 Crooks Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Damascus, Fac Of Med, Damascus, Syria
Graduation Year: 1972

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Navakanth Gorrepati, MD
(248) 992-0504
3160 Greenfield Rd Apt 15A
Royal Oak, MI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Souheil Gebara
(248) 551-0487
3535 W 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Specialty
Pediatric Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Robert M Truding
(248) 423-3144
3535 W 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Specialty
Pediatric Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Varsha Ganesh Deshmukh
(248) 423-2454
3601 W 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Specialty
Pediatric Gastroenterology

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Help for Those with Gas

Provided by: 

By Lindsey Galloway

Certain foods have been shown to instigate this annoying—and often embarrassing—problem. “Microbes in the digestive tract feed on the carbohydrates we consume,” says Gerard Mullin, MD, director of Integrative GI Nutrition Services at Johns Hopkins Hospital. “Those bacteria act like a little brewery in our gut, metabolizing sugars. And that fermentation process produces gas.”

The more complex the carbohydrate, the longer it takes to break down—and the more likely it is to cause a buildup of gas. While people often point to beans and dairy products as gas producers, don’t forget these other common causes:

Cruciferous Veggies. Yes, the cancer-fighting virtues of broccoli and cauliflower can’t be overlooked, but these foods also rank among the worse gas producers, thanks to an indigestible sugar they contain called raffinose (the same sugar that gives beans their gas-producing reputation). Adding new varieties of these veggies to your diet slowly and eating them regularly can actually help your digestive system become more acclimated to the sugar.

High-Fructose Corn Syrup. The human body never evolved to handle the high doses of fructose we consume today—it simply can’t fully digest much more than 25 grams in one sitting. (To put that in perspective, that’s how much is in just one can of Coke.)

Greasy, Fried Foods. While fat itself won’t cause gas, grease puts the digestive system in slow-mo, and that gives bad bacteria more time to ferment the food in the intestine, making gas much worse.

Some foods can actually help prevent gas, or at least lessen the symptoms. “Papaya and pineapple have naturally occurring enzymes that help the intestinal microbes break down complex carbs,” explains Mullin. Yogurt with active cultures can also help restore the natural balance of intestinal bacteria.

Author: Lindsey Galloway

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